2011 Rules Comments: Holing Out Page Title Module
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  • #61
    i've never seen a wedgie of the un-underpants related sort, so it was demonstrated to me this last weekend at team golf what it would look like... frankly... looks like a bad putt to me, i can actually see where the pdga is coming from on this one... at least i think i can... honestly, this is a very confusing thread... and it's made me realize the importance of putting practice and good solid putts, that's for sure...
    "'There are two mantras.,' Bernard said, 'Yum and yuk. Mine is yum.'"
    Tom Robbins, Still Life With Woodpecker

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    • #62
      It's good. Any wedgie not observed because the group was too far away to see it or it was a blind hole, is good. The group watching a putt properly go over the basket rim then wedge on the way out is also good. Only "bad" shots observed by the group that either enter the basket below the rim and wedge, or come thru the top, will be not good.

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      • #63
        So My question is what do the manufactures who all sell some sort of soft or floppy putter think of this?
        rewindb.com

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        • #64
          One is on the Rules Committee. Not sure it even entered into anyone's mind. A bad putt is a bad putt. If it made sense to make baskets solid basins in the beginning, it would have been done. But the way they were made with heavy duty wire turned out to be efficient from a strength, durability and weight standpoint but unfortunately they let some putts stick in the side.

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          • #65
            Everybody is talking about "wedgies" being bad shots....Every time I have done, or have seen a "wedgie", it hasn't been a putt, It has always been an up shot. Hitting the basket on an up-shot is a pretty good shot!

            Seems the rules committee is doing things just to say they did something.
            A bad day on the golf course is better than a good day at work!

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            • #66
              Hitting the number plate, the chain support and pipe are all theoretically "good" on upshots but that alone does not mean you should have completed the hole. If that's the case, then let's go back to poles with no expensive baskets required.

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              • #67
                This is a great rule

                Enough said...
                Future's so bright, I gotta wear shades.

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                • #68
                  Rules are always made/modified AFTER the situation

                  Originally posted by Chuck Kennedy View Post
                  Hitting the number plate, the chain support and pipe are all theoretically "good" on upshots but that alone does not mean you should have completed the hole. If that's the case, then let's go back to poles with no expensive baskets required.
                  Everything you mentioned number plate, chain support and actual pole (we call that a Marco) and even nubs all reward bad or poor putting. Nubs really only help on full throws/ace runs.

                  The old run basically stated The disc must come to rest on any part intended to support the disc was considered "Holed out".

                  Think of ball golf
                  1. On the green the flag must come out either before the stroke or as the ball nears the hole (tended). The flag may not interfere with the roll of the putt.
                  2. Its the players choice to remove the flag or not if he/she is just off the green. It is in his/her best intrest that the flag stays in because if it hits the flag and goes in it counts.
                  3. On a hole in one you must remove the ball without removing the flag for it to count.
                  4. How about the shot that hits the stick or flag and drops straight down and in.

                  With this in mind realize our sport has already designed discs for this very purpose. The bullet was too small, The zephyr (until recently) was too big. Now don't get me wrong uniformity is a good thing but...

                  What this really means to me is the manufactures lobbied the board in such a way that they were able to influence the policies of the pDGA. Which is easier(and less expensive) re design all the Discs AND Baskets or change the rules?
                  1. I am still curious how many times wedgies actually happens?
                  2. Did the current rule actually cost someone a championship during the past year?
                  I have played since 1998 and have seen it maybe 25 times (Not counting LSH and it's patio furniture targets) One recently by an better then average player who threw a disc designed for that very purpose stick in the outside of the cage. And I have a personal experience of the drop threw the top. Mine stuck and the next player putted and it dropped.



                  Oh Boy Tone Poles
                  What a great idea! Anyone remember the old controversy..."well? we did not see it hit. but we sure heard it hit! so it's Holed Out, Right?" (whether it hit the base of the pole hard enough to sound the bell ring.)
                  rewindb.com

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                  • #69
                    Let's just put holes in the ground. That would solve the problem.

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                    • #70
                      If all baskets were exactly the same design with exactly the same gap openings similar to the consistency of a ball golf hole, you might be able to make the argument that we ought to let the fluky wedgies from the outside count, just for simplicity. But shots were never intended to count coming in the side of the basket, or worse yet, the bottom. I've seen a bottom wedgie ace back in the 90s on an old Mach II. Down the road, for an observer outside our sport, I don't think you want to have a major event where the player holes out with a wedgie in the side. Not good is not good.

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Ol' Bob View Post
                        Yeah, what if the wedgie is going through the back side of the basket and is over half way out, but still hanging? Could happen. My only wedgie birdie was on 18 at Trojan, when I stuck my floppy IV-times, JK Pro Aviar in the front. But what if it had cleared the front rim and stuck, going out the back, but nobody was in position to see it get there?
                        The basket was designed to bypass this issue.
                        The new rules are obviously designed for top tier tourneys.
                        It only creates a headache for the rest of us.
                        When a ball dreams, it dreams it's a Frisbee.

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                        • #72
                          And it's a good thing there aren't any top tier tourneys in Oregon. Oh, wait...

                          As pointed out, wedgies happen so infrequently that people usually have to pull out the rulebook to make sure they know how to call it. The rule will just have a different result next year for some cases.
                          Last edited by Chuck Kennedy; December 15th, 2010, 05:26 PM.

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                          • #73
                            Well yeah, I could never get close enough with my tiny drive for anything you'd call a "putt" on Trojan 18. I use that JK Pro IV-Times mainly as an approach disc. If I was inside 10 meters, I'd never be throwing hard enough to stick one, nor would I select a soft putter so as to try to. Well anyway, I don't play tourneys anymore and I keep track of my score the way I wuz learnt to. I'm too old to be retrained now. I never bet more than my bag tag number, so I'm not likely to get challenged to a duel of honor over my second ever wedgie hole-out.
                            The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                            ...but it plays one on TV.

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                            • #74
                              I really like the new rule. There is already enough luck (good and bad) in disc golf; we don't need to find more ways of increasing the luck factor, especially when it is so easy to remedy in a situation such as this.

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                              • #75
                                I've never been able understand why a disc on top doesn't count but one jammed in the side did. It seems pretty clear that the basket was designed to catch discs on the inside. This rule just clears things up a little. I like it.

                                Yeah, it may cost someone a stroke or two over the course of their career. I consider it a small price to pay.

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