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  • #16
    I think it is disrespectful to any one person who may have been on a wait list and was ultimately unable to play.
    "Love is not primarily a relationship to a specific person. Love is an attitude, an ordination of character which determines the relatedness of the person to the whole world as a whole, not toward one object of love.

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    • #17
      Just another indication that folks value different things in different ways...
      educate your thinking

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      • #18
        two words...

        weak. sauce.



        your rating (with enough rounds under your belt, anyway) is a pretty darn good indicator of the type of golfer you are in a tournament situation... and that includes when you play like poop... which happens more for some people and less for others.

        yes, i am sad that i didn't break 900 this season but it is not because of an unfair rating system it is because in several tournaments i played like poop. and if you can't accept that sometimes you play like poop... well, then... freaking get better...

        the slosh finale at Lunchtime was a horribly humiliating experience for me... i didn't want to look at anyone, or talk to anyone or finish the damn tournament... easily the worst golf i have ever played in my life... 804 rated round... i did not drop out to save my rating... i came back (knowing there was no chance for me to win and quite possibly had just screwed my goal for the season of breaking 900 before the season even really started) and pulled myself together and shot a 900+ round because the humiliation of shooting 804 is nothing compared to what a lame-o crybaby i would have felt like if i'd dropped...

        and my karmic payback? despite not knowing the "2.5 times your standard deviation below your rating" rule, my round was so terrible it didn't end up counting anyway...
        "'There are two mantras.,' Bernard said, 'Yum and yuk. Mine is yum.'"
        Tom Robbins, Still Life With Woodpecker

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        • #19
          Originally posted by emmarose View Post
          weak. sauce.



          your rating (with enough rounds under your belt, anyway) is a pretty darn good indicator of the type of golfer you are in a tournament situation... and that includes when you play like poop... which happens more for some people and less for others.

          yes, i am sad that i didn't break 900 this season but it is not because of an unfair rating system it is because in several tournaments i played like poop. and if you can't accept that sometimes you play like poop... well, then... freaking get better...

          the slosh finale at Lunchtime was a horribly humiliating experience for me... i didn't want to look at anyone, or talk to anyone or finish the damn tournament... easily the worst golf i have ever played in my life... 804 rated round... i did not drop out to save my rating... i came back (knowing there was no chance for me to win and quite possibly had just screwed my goal for the season of breaking 900 before the season even really started) and pulled myself together and shot a 900+ round because the humiliation of shooting 804 is nothing compared to what a lame-o crybaby i would have felt like if i'd dropped...

          and my karmic payback? despite not knowing the "2.5 times your standard deviation below your rating" rule, my round was so terrible it didn't end up counting anyway...
          That's because you're a disc golf soldier! Droppers make me sad.
          "Honest work is for the downtrodden and the Polish"
          Cleveland Brown

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          • #20
            Originally posted by JMan View Post
            Just another indication that folks value different things in different ways...
            Thanks J - you summed up my feelings nicely.

            I get that people will drop or tank to save their ratings. It's not for me personally, but I can see how/why some would.

            The original post mentioned people not turning in a card - now that is some serious weak sauce because it affects other people. Are there instances where this has happened?

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Scott View Post
              Are there instances where this has happened?
              YES!

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              • #22
                Originally posted by emmarose View Post
                weak. sauce.



                your rating (with enough rounds under your belt, anyway) is a pretty darn good indicator of the type of golfer you are in a tournament situation... and that includes when you play like poop... which happens more for some people and less for others.

                yes, i am sad that i didn't break 900 this season but it is not because of an unfair rating system it is because in several tournaments i played like poop. and if you can't accept that sometimes you play like poop... well, then... freaking get better...

                the slosh finale at Lunchtime was a horribly humiliating experience for me... i didn't want to look at anyone, or talk to anyone or finish the damn tournament... easily the worst golf i have ever played in my life... 804 rated round... i did not drop out to save my rating... i came back (knowing there was no chance for me to win and quite possibly had just screwed my goal for the season of breaking 900 before the season even really started) and pulled myself together and shot a 900+ round because the humiliation of shooting 804 is nothing compared to what a lame-o crybaby i would have felt like if i'd dropped...

                and my karmic payback? despite not knowing the "2.5 times your standard deviation below your rating" rule, my round was so terrible it didn't end up counting anyway...
                Basket thieves

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Scott View Post
                  The original post mentioned people not turning in a card - now that is some serious weak sauce because it affects other people. Are there instances where this has happened?
                  Unfortunately, it happens a lot more than it should.

                  Also, I didn't really think about it affecting others. It would pull other people's ratings down by rating the course easier than it actually was. It would be more apparent in smaller tournaments. I assume Chuck Kennedy will correct me if I'm wrong here.

                  This ups the Parks asshole index for intentionally not turning in the card from "harmless skullduggery" to "definite douchebaggery."
                  We're at our best when it's from our hips

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Parks View Post
                    Unfortunately, it happens a lot more than it should.

                    Also, I didn't really think about it affecting others. It would pull other people's ratings down by rating the course easier than it actually was. It would be more apparent in smaller tournaments. I assume Chuck Kennedy will correct me if I'm wrong here.

                    This ups the Parks asshole index for intentionally not turning in the card from "harmless skullduggery" to "definite douchebaggery."
                    So not only did you 999 yourself, but three other people as well? Douchebaggery indeed.

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                    • #25
                      I have never quit a tournament and i hope i never will in the future. To quit a tournament to save a rating just means you are not a true player. Your rating is not true therefor your professionalism is a lie in the sport of disc golf.

                      To quit a tournament for any other reason can be understandable and would not be anyone elses business. Losing too many discs in water, sore back, other players getting in your head so you have to leave before you lose it, etc.

                      I came very, very, very close not showing up on sunday during the tale of two rivers. Those who know me can understand that i usually do not have awful rounds that would make me quit. Two years ago i shot a 881 and 907 rated rounds at riverside........yeah i know ..........tell me about it. So i made it a point that this year there was no way i was going to let it get me. Well, it did.......shot a 888 and 944..........im a 970 rated player. It took every inch of integrity and to humble myself to get up and play with my peers on sunday morning and im glad i did.......had a good laugh and therefor a good time.
                      WHEN I GROW UP I WANT TO BE A SPIDER BITE.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Scott View Post
                        So not only did you 999 yourself, but three other people as well? Douchebaggery indeed.
                        Wat?

                        I don't think I've ever not turned in my card.

                        I also am not sure where the three other people thing came from. People can choose to not turn in their card even though the rest of the flight turns theirs in.
                        We're at our best when it's from our hips

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                        • #27
                          A propagator dropping out completely or tanking their round will not affect the ratings calculation for others. If a propagator shoots more than 60 points below their rating, they are not used to determine the course rating for that round. One downside of a player dropping out mid-round is if they were in a 3-some. That would leave the "not allowed" 2 players in the group to complete the round.

                          If a player has the card at the end of the round and doesn't turn it in, it could also DNF the other players on the card. However, they are allowed to recreate their scores getting together as a group to figure them out.

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                          • #28
                            I assume that the "three other players" reference is for events that use one scorecard for the group to record scores in lieu of individual scorecards for each player.

                            IMHO, the use of one scorecard for the round is the way to go for many reasons.

                            1) A more efficient way to record scores during the round.

                            2) Easier on the TD to transfer scores to the Event Scoreboard.

                            3) It encourages players to turn in their round scores and more data is better at determinings round ratings. If a player's score is really that bad, it won't be used anyway. And with that, the player's score won't be used in their individual rating. So, the player with the bad round just needs to accept the fact that they didn't perform as expected and move on to the next round.

                            From what I've seen, the players that willfully withheld thier round scores, did so to either protect the almighty "1000+" player rating (Pro), avoid seeing a sub 900 round rating (Am), or to avoid getting slack from their peers.

                            Ratings are just a number and a general representative of a player's performance for a given number a rounds (player rating) and a standard to use compare individual rounds (round ratings).

                            Ratings are a great tool to use in comparing performance levels of players (ratings) and courses (SSA) over a given amount time. Scores aren't a good representation of a player's performance level. Course layouts and conditions change over time. A score of 58 at Seatac Park isn't the same as a 58 at Lakewood.

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                            • #29
                              you should quit only if you end up in a coffin.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Chuck Kennedy View Post
                                A propagator dropping out completely or tanking their round will not affect the ratings calculation for others. If a propagator shoots more than 60 points below their rating, they are not used to determine the course rating for that round.
                                Right. So someone is having a bad round, say almost 60 points below their rating and they don't turn in their card.

                                Instead of that low rating counting toward the ratings calculation it is dropped due to not turning in the card. It would be a tiny difference in the ratings for that tournament, but could be noticeable if there were few enough players.
                                We're at our best when it's from our hips

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