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  • #16
    I have to call BS on the "raised right" thing. I have a friend who had a half pit bull and he had to have it put down as soon as it reached maturity. He couldn't have it chomping on his kid. The dog showed none of this tendency before maturity. It was loved up to the max.

    One breed that can be extremely dangerous is St. Bernard. Most people don't know that because they have been given a good image in various media. Dobermans and rottweilers have the image that goes with their breeds. Pit bulls are notorious because of their record, which reflects their breeding, not because people "freak out and call the news."

    BTW, don't forget, the course at Lucky Mud is dog free. Don't bring any breed here (unless you understand it will stay locked in your car until you are once again down the road).
    The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
    ...but it plays one on TV.

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    • #17
      You can't discount the hundreds of years of selective breeding. Pit bulls are bred for their aggressiveness, it is what it is. But, that said, not every single pit bull is exactly the same. And some will be more influenced by their upbringing than others. It's like saying all asians are good in math. Clearly not true all the time, but there are tendencies. Stereotypes arise for a reason, and pit bulls have the stereotype of being aggressive, whether you want to accept that or not.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by mowens404 View Post
        Of the 5-6 pit-bulls that have been in my life, for all of theirs, I never had, heard, or saw any problem with aggression what so ever. but at the same time, every time I see my grandmas Pomeranian, that little shit bites my ankles so much I have to lock him up.
        The point isn't that Pit's are the most aggressive dog. The point is that when they do bite your ankles..... you lose a foot.
        A bad day on the golf course is better than a good day at work!

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        • #19
          I think we have kicked the pit bull thing around a few times already on this forum. Let's start talking about something new.

          So...is it ok to write my name on a basket after an ace?

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          • #20
            ^ Only at Lake Stevens.
            "What's in the bag", pdga #37977, dgcr #356, **Team Chainbanger'z**


            You are never really playing an opponent. You are playing yourself, your own highest standards, and when you reach your limits, that is real joy.
            -- Arthur Ashe

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            • #21
              So sad when anything like this happens...if you've met me chances are you know I'm a dog guy. I hate to hear about any dog passing in this fashion...although I have had to protect my little terriers at Pier, and Orchard from larger aggressive dogs, one a rott, the other a pit. Both dogs were, in my opinion to much for their owners, as both were able to get away from the owners easily. Both of the aggressive dogs are still alive. I allow my dogs off leash only at Hornings, and then only if there are no other dogs around. If there are other dogs I use my leash...it's for the dogs protection.

              My heart goes out to all species involved in this unfortunate incident...
              educate your thinking

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              • #22
                I was really surprised when I read the article and found out that this didn't happen at Leverich Park.

                Seriously, you go down there on a nice day and it's like the place is an off-leash park for Pits only or something.

                Can't say I blame the guy though. All the dog owners I know would've done the same thing.

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                • #23
                  i really have no idea why i keep reading this ridiculous thread. People are always going to have there own opinion and not much will ever change there mind. I go by fact. nothing more.
                  Frisbeetarianism is the belief that when you die, your soul goes up to the roof and gets stuck - George Carlin

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                  • #24
                    To say that any breed of dog is more aggressive than another takes more than a few anecdotal cases. The same could be said of a person that thinks that black people are more aggressive because the only robberies that they or the people that they know have seen were committed by blacks.

                    Without statistics to back it up, then it doesn't make much sense. For example, someone could make the argument that black people are more aggressive than other ethnicities based on the fact that more black people are in jail than any other ethnicity and commit crimes at a much higher rate as a percentage of population than others. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarce...ates#Ethnicity

                    Can the same be said about pit bulls?

                    Also, statistics without context are meaningless so would it actually prove anything without a more in depth understanding of the upbringing and other variables?
                    We're at our best when it's from our hips

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                    • #25
                      http://www.dogsbite.org/dangerous-do...bull-myths.php

                      In the 3-year period from 2006 to 2008, pit bull type dogs killed 52 Americans and accounted for 59% of all fatal attacks. Combined, pit bulls and rottweilers accounted for 73% of these deaths.
                      http://dogbitelaw.com/dog-bite-stati...y-to-kill.html


                      "Studies indicate that pit bull-type dogs were involved in approximately a third of human DBRF (i.e., dog bite related fatalities) reported during the 12-year period from 1981 through1992, and Rottweilers were responsible for about half of human DBRF reported during the 4 years from 1993 through 1996....[T]he data indicate that Rottweilers and pit bull-type dogs accounted for 67% of human DBRF in the United States between 1997 and 1998. It is extremely unlikely that they accounted for anywhere near 60% of dogs in the United States during that same period and, thus, there appears to be a breed-specific problem with fatalities."
                      Last edited by Ol' Bob; May 10th, 2012, 10:41 PM.
                      The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                      ...but it plays one on TV.

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                      • #26
                        ...

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                        • #27
                          It could also be said that the breeds mentioned have higher numbers of people who own them so this would give it a better chance that an attack could happen. I see pit bulls everywhere and they seem to be the cool dog to own at this time.

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                          • #28
                            These articles are exactly the same as the ones that could be used for the argument "black people are more aggressive than other ethnicities." They leave rely more on raw statistics than analysis of the situation.

                            Neither article addressed the owners of the dogs in a meaningful way. One article mentions that a Pomeranian killed an infant when the two were placed on a bed together and left alone. The article indicates this may have been an unsafe situation. Are the same people attracted to pit bulls more likely to create these unsafe situations? I could see people looking for a guard dog, a tough looking dog, or a mean dog to be correlated with low awareness of such unsafe situations.

                            Neither article addresses the upbringing of the dogs or whether the owners placed them in unsafe environments at the time of the attacks due to ignorance or spite.
                            We're at our best when it's from our hips

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Scotty B View Post
                              It could also be said that the breeds mentioned have higher numbers of people who own them so this would give it a better chance that an attack could happen. I see pit bulls everywhere and they seem to be the cool dog to own at this time.
                              One article did address this issue and Bob actually quoted the relevant passage, although it framed it as a guess rather than an actual fact that was researched: "[T]he data indicate that Rottweilers and pit bull-type dogs accounted for 67% of human DBRF in the United States between 1997 and 1998. It is extremely unlikely that they accounted for anywhere near 60% of dogs in the United States during that same period and, thus, there appears to be a breed-specific problem with fatalities."
                              We're at our best when it's from our hips

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                              • #30
                                imho the problem lies with the owner more than the dog (whichever breed) If you cannot control your dog in public, or know how to purchase a leash that will not break, it is on you and you should be willing to accept the fact that someone will do all they can to protect their loved ones no matter what action it takes to stop the attack, including killing the offending pooch . It was a sad and unnecessary event and I feel worse for the disc golfer that had to kill the dog than I do for the dog or owner.

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