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  • Problems I'm having at 300 feet

    So, I'm firmly stuck at the 300' mark. I'll admit I throw discs I probably shouldn't: destroyers and wraiths. I also throw leos, Valks, and tbirds though. They all max out at 300 feet though, leos, destroyers, tbirds, and all.

    What's more I find my self hurting after a few rounds the next day. My first knuckle on my right index finger is killing me and my left knee feels a little unstable.

    I throw RHBH and my grip is all four finger pads tight on the inside rim with pressure from the base of my thumb. the tip of my thumb doesn't do anything but rest on the rim of the disc. I'm thinking about changing my grip so that my index finger rests across the edge of the disc.

    I feel like my left foot leaves the pad before I throw and have no idea why my knee would hurt.

    I recognize that my form needs work. I don't know where to start building it up though. Can anyone break down for me how to start building the finesse required to let the disc do the work and build some real distance?

  • #2
    thumb should be where the inside part of the rim meets the plate, not near the outer edge of the rim...

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    • #3
      You tube has everything you want. Just look around.
      Disc golf by day, Joe rogan podcast by night! All day!

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, I've tried You tube, Denny. Thanks for the suggestion though. I haven't found anything on line for people who are sitting at 300' though. It all seems geared towards beginners or people throwing 400' and nothing explains my hurt finger.

        I feel like I'm doing everything you tube and disc golf review articles tell me. but my index finger hurts and I only get 300'. so something is wrong and I thought I'd try a direct approach by asking some local experts.

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        • #5
          Where are you located at?

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          • #6
            It would be really helpful for you to have video of your drive and an image with the clearest disc you have of your grip from the underside of the disc for people on here to give you any solid advice. I do recommend http://www.discgolfreview.com/resour...tml#powerloss7 as some reading material for you, though. The links throughout there contain more useful information as well.

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            • #7
              Best advice, find better players and play with them. Watch and learn.
              Disc golf by day, Joe rogan podcast by night! All day!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Denny View Post
                Best advice, find better players and play with them. Watch and learn.
                Can't disagree there. Made a world of difference when my home course went from Greenway to Lunchtime. Met lots of good people (who are also good at disc golf, and willing to share advice), and had a far more challenging course, to boot. Cheers, Lunchtime Crowd!

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                • #9
                  Don't know how old you are but, regardless you need to make sure you stretch! The older I get it seems the more important it is. I've had major knee troubles from disc golf. I stretch and warm up really good before each round. As for your fingers it sounds to me as if your joints or muscles in your fingers are straining. Your grip sounds like the typical power grip which is good! It's not uncommon to be able to throw teebirds as far as destroyers and bosses! I would stick with wraiths, teebirds and roc's and pull the d's and bosses out of your bag for awhile. Most likely your over compensation will force a more stable way faster disc to hurt your grip, hands, knee and form. Try power gripping your t's and wraiths on your drives and fan gripping your roc's and putters. I've been around disc golf for 20yrs and have watched too many am's throw way to much disc.....stable discs like destros, forces, etc are made for players with super hard snap. If you can't throw a stable disc 400 feet you shouldn't be throwing it! Good luck....

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                  • #10
                    I used to have problems at 300 feet. Now if I have them, they're at 250.

                    They told me to cheer up, things could be worse. So I cheered up, and sure enough, things got worse.
                    The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                    ...but it plays one on TV.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Without seeing your grip or drive firsthand, it's hard to give effective advice. From the sounds of it, you first need to change your grip. Your thumb needs to be on top of the flight plate, right on top of your first index knuckle. If you move your thumb towards the rim, your loosing critical grip power at the snap--right when you need it most. Your index finger is hurting because it's doing all the work of pulling the disc through the snap. You can also try gripping with the tips of your fingers instead of the pads. If you do this properly, your fingernails should be flat against the bottom of the flight plate and your palm will be facing up instead of clamped against the rim. This may seem awkward at first, but requires much less grip force to carry the disc through the snap and keeps your wrist stable throughout the entire throw. The most important thing is to NOT take your index finger out of the grip--that will cost you a ton of power and make your release unreliable on a power drive.

                      The next thing you need to work on is your footwork. Slow down. Go back to basics. If your foot is leaving the pad before you release the disc, then you're probably throwing more with your arm than with your entire body and your feet are getting ahead of you. If you want to crack 300', you need to throw with your entire body, not your arm. Your throw should start at your hips and drag the rest of your body along for the ride. Your arm and hand are there to maintain control of the disc through the throw and release the disc at the right time--not to do most of the work.

                      I'm telling you this because I was at the same place that you are now, stuck behind a 300' wall, and these are the two key things that helped me get to the next barrier---the 400' wall. I can occasionally get out past 400', but the accuracy of the throw is anybody's guess. That's definitely one thing I've learned after practicing thousands of drives...never use 100% of your power. If you put everything you've got into a throw, you're going to lose control of the shot. Remember the Pirelli slogan, "power is nothing without control".

                      I also recommend that you read every article on DiscGolfReview, here:

                      http://www.discgolfreview.com/resources/articles.shtml

                      and here:

                      http://www.discgolfreview.com/resources/technique.shtml

                      there are also a ton of 'drive analysis' videos here:

                      http://www.discgolfreview.com/resour...analysis.shtml

                      Finally, as others have mentioned, find a group of players that are far better than you and beg to play with them. You'd be surprised how eager some pros are to give advice to a struggling novice.
                      Last edited by Burge; June 12th, 2011, 10:47 AM.
                      "When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." -- Jimi Hendrix

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mcbentz View Post
                        If you can't throw a stable disc 400 feet you shouldn't be throwing it!
                        This is some of the best advice that is rarely heeded.
                        "When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." -- Jimi Hendrix

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Burge View Post
                          This is some of the best advice that is rarely heeded.
                          Or not, regardless of your definition of stable.

                          Both Firebirds and Teebirds can and should be well-used at about 300 feet of power.
                          We're at our best when it's from our hips

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                          • #14
                            Lots of links to discgolfreview, and that is good. Check out their forums, as well. Posting a video of yourself in the Video Critique section can do you a lot of good.

                            Also, as others have mentioned, try to hook up with better people in your area and learn from them.
                            We're at our best when it's from our hips

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Parks View Post
                              Or not, regardless of your definition of stable.

                              Both Firebirds and Teebirds can and should be well-used at about 300 feet of power.
                              I'd agree to this.
                              "Honest work is for the downtrodden and the Polish"
                              Cleveland Brown

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