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  • #31
    Originally posted by Knuckles Dakota View Post
    1. While my drives certainly look like they are flying on a better line thanks to improved technique they still won't break that 300' barrier. What happens is that they travel quite straight for about 200-250' start to turn or fade and look for all the world like they will just keep on going for another 100 feet or so and then at 280-290 (every time!) they just lose power and fall to the ground right in front of 300' like it's an invisible barrier. I think my best throws get about 295'. I'm using leopards, tee birds, a side winder, a stratus, and a valk. for practice. Is 300' with these discs on a long straight-ish path pretty typical? Should I be looking to throw higher with them to get the distance, working on hyzer flip with them, or something else I have not considered?
    What do you mean by "turn or fade"? Fade usually means "hyzering out" i.e. the last part of a disc's flight. For a right handed backhand throw that means turning to the left. If the disc is released flat and then fades then you are not getting enough snap -or- you're rolling your wrist. Usually a wrist roll can be seen by the nose angle of the disc (nose up = rolling your thumb down, nose down / flipping disc = rolling your hand toward the pinky). With Sidewinders and Valks especially you should see the disc "flip over" and travel to the right and then hook back left @ the end of the flight path. Both of those discs are known to have a lot of movement in their flights.

    However, I will once again reiterate my suggestion that you go out to the field with a putter or midrange (Roc, Buzz, etc.). These discs will quickly highlight form problems when thrown with power. Start with no run up... just a simple reach-back & throw. An average person should be able to throw the mid range 300ft with this kind of throw (plus you'll want to practice this for approach shots anyway!).

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Greg_R View Post
      An average person should be able to throw the mid range 300ft with this kind of throw (plus you'll want to practice this for approach shots anyway!).
      The average person DOES NOT throw a mid range three hundred feet from a standing position. I would be willing to bet that most pro level players do not throw mid ranges three hundred feet from a standing position. Please don't have a person that is having difficulty reaching three hundred feet with a run up and drivers feel even more challenged by saying that this is true.

      As far as your distance, it is great to hear that you feel that your form is improving and the discs are flying straighter. With that being said and your note that you are still not getting any farther, it seems that you have reached the limit of your throw due to the speed of your throw. It is true that form is of utmost importance, but when the rubber hits the road, if you have the most perfect form in the galaxy and are releasing the disc at 30 miles an hour, it's only going to go so far. At some point, you are going to have to get that upper body rotation and arm moving faster to help accommodate a longer throw.

      Keep at it and have fun!

      Later,
      Scott Papa
      Team Discraft
      Instructional Editor DiscGolfer Magazine
      Team Discraft
      Instructional Editor DiscGolfer Magazine

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by papatart View Post
        The average person DOES NOT throw a mid range three hundred feet from a standing position. I would be willing to bet that most pro level players do not throw mid ranges three hundred feet from a standing position. Please don't have a person that is having difficulty reaching three hundred feet with a run up and drivers feel even more challenged by saying that this is true.

        As far as your distance, it is great to hear that you feel that your form is improving and the discs are flying straighter. With that being said and your note that you are still not getting any farther, it seems that you have reached the limit of your throw due to the speed of your throw. It is true that form is of utmost importance, but when the rubber hits the road, if you have the most perfect form in the galaxy and are releasing the disc at 30 miles an hour, it's only going to go so far. At some point, you are going to have to get that upper body rotation and arm moving faster to help accommodate a longer throw.

        Keep at it and have fun!

        Later,
        Scott Papa
        Team Discraft
        Instructional Editor DiscGolfer Magazine
        Scott, you stole my advice right out of my keyboard.

        Just a few points that I think you could consider, as well as anyone else on the board looking to increase distance.

        1. Your form is not perfect.
        - I doubt anyone truly has perfect form, but there are a lot of golfers with pretty dang good form. Finding something that works and is repeatable is key. I suggest contacting a local pro and offering to pay for lessons. This does two thins: Makes your form a lot better and also helps out those who have spent a lot of time in the sport. Getting to a comfortable point with your grip, footwork, reach back and follow through will go a long way.

        2. Drill Drill Drill
        - Not that many people spend time really drilling their technique. If you look at any other competitive sport and those who excell, you'll notice really how much time they spend practicing. How many hours did Larry Bird spend in a gym shooting? How many balls did Tiger Woods hit over and over again at the range? A freaking ton, thats how many. How many drives have you thrown in the last week? Month? Year? Lets not fool ourselves, if we don't spend the time to get better, we shouldn't expect amazing results and/or scores on the course.

        3. Speed Kills
        - Like Scott said, until you get your arm speed up, the disc is going to have limitations. I have always had quick hands in the martial arts and in disc golf, and if I had to guess, I'd say I have more fast twitch muscle fibers in my arm/body than slow twitch. We will all have our own limitations on how fast our arm can move, but with practice and training, we should be able to reach our potential. In 2004, I was clocked at 66 MPH on both my backhand and sidearm. in 2011 I was clocked at 75 MPH on my back hand, only 4 MPH shy of Double G (aka the farthest throwing human on earth right now).

        - Speed will at first kill your technique. Try to slow down and be smooth. Once you accomplish that, speed it up. Then, speed will kill the target when you blow up the chains from down town.

        4. Understand the Disc
        - Keep trying different discs to find what works well with your armspeed and spin. The typical "understable" discs such as valks and sidewinders should be displaying a S curve flight path (turning right initially and fading back left at the end). If not, there may be two things happening - 1. your release angle may be off, probably too much hyzer angle, I'd suggest throwing as flat as possible. 2. They really are just too much disc for you. I like the fact you use a Leopard and a Stratus. Do you notice a different flight with those discs than the faster drivers?
        - Spend some time trying different heights and release angles. You'll be surpised how many different ways a single disc can fly when you try different things. Its a lot of fun and should help you get to know your discs better.
        - Its hard to try everything out there, especially with the budget of most dg'ers. Get a hold of some friends and all decide to share some plastic, try other drivers out and see what happens.

        Slow to Quick (Discraft guide of "understable" plastic).

        Mids: Comet, Meteor, Glide
        Fairway: Impact, Stratus
        Drivers: Xpress, XS, XL, Cyclone
        High Speed Drivers: Avenger SS, Flash, Surge SS, Nuke SS

        Good luck on your pursuit of the game. Just as a reference, it took me a few months to hit 300. Then a summer later I started throwing high 300's. Then the next summer I cracked 400. And so on and so on. It will take time. Stick with it and have fun. If all else fails, just become a really good putter and still beat everyone who throws farther than you
        Team DISCRAFT
        NW Sign Up
        Gorilla Boy
        Paragon Disc Golf
        Odwalla

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        • #34
          Ron,
          I liked your line:
          "just become a really good putter and still beat everyone who throws farther than you"

          Definitely my current strategy. May I add controlled upshot to the list of items I'm trying to focus on over raw distance, speed, and power. I have always liked Emma's advice to me of 100 practice putts each day. Weather in the PDGA or pga I do believe the mantra: "Drive for show, Putt for dough". But a consistent 400 foot drive would sure be nice to have.
          PDGA# 49616
          Stumptown# 353
          OTDG: Young Guns - SAT

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