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  • #16
    Firebirds are great tomahawk discs, no matter how far you can throw.
    Oregon disc golf map

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    • #17
      i'm not going to try to give you any advice on how to get more distance... i'll let the big arm boys handle that but as far as pain in your joints i do have a bit of advice... i've got myself riddled all up with aches and pains due to tendonitis and arthritis from several breaks and strains, including my thumb and middle finger on my throwing hand... mostly i just accept that it is what it is and it's going to hurt, however... taking down the swelling is an effective way of reducing the pain. i don't wait until after my round to take a few ibuprofens, i find that if i take them before or midway thru the round it's much more effective and i deal with much less pain and swelling...

      good luck...
      "'There are two mantras.,' Bernard said, 'Yum and yuk. Mine is yum.'"
      Tom Robbins, Still Life With Woodpecker

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      • #18
        Tip: Put all your drivers back into your bag and pull out a putter (Aviar, etc.) and head to the practice field. Throwing the putter for distance will quickly highlight form problems (plus it's nicer to play catch with). There are a number of things that could be going wrong; the likely suspects include speed (too fast/frantic), your grip, and wrist-rolling. Once you are smoothly cranking the putter over 200ft then give one of your midranges (Roc, etc.) a try. With good form, 300ft should not be a problem with the midrange.

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        • #19
          Knuckle pain

          I have had a similar problem (pain-wise). I most often use a 2 finger grip forehand and backhand and get that same pain. I find it usually means I'm gripping too hard and getting too much rip off that finger . Switched to a 3 finger for big tosses (or just more control on approach) and the pain went away.
          Last edited by Rakoz; June 14th, 2011, 07:27 AM. Reason: clarification
          FORE! Youth 2011 http://www.discgolfscene.com/tournam...RE_Youth_2011/

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Parks View Post
            Or not, regardless of your definition of stable.
            True...from one player to the next, 'stability' can be a highly subjective term. What one player may consider to be 'stable', another player might use as a turnover disc -- and it usually has nothing to do with power. The advice is mainly for new players that think to get more distance they need to get the latest and greatest disc that everybody else is throwing. I think this is a classic mistake. Anybody with enough experience knows that an improvement in form can make everything that's already in your bag go drastically farther.

            When I first started playing, a friend gave me an old DX Eagle and an APX to get started. I took one look at the Eagle and thought, "How the hell am ever going to get this itty-bitty thing to go far?" After throwing big fat lids for decades and playing Ultimate for a couple years, that little Eagle seemed like a bottle cap that wouldn't do anything I wanted it to. After a few weeks of being humbled by a little yellow disc, my friend's seemingly effortless one-finger 350' flick, and the old 21-hole circuit at Downriver, I finally lucked-out and threw a complete fluke of a high sidearm anny at #20 that felt beautiful as it left my hand. I was blown away as it slowly flexed back to flat and sailed over the entire rock pile to land ~40 feet from the basket. It was then that I understood that the key to the game is form, not force. As much as I tried, I was never able to get that much distance with that disc again, but after an entire year of diligent practice, I was able to develop a decent backhand and was getting a Sidewinder to hyzer-flip for the same distance. It then took me another year to be able to get a Wraith to that far.

            I see 'finesse-before-force' proven time an time again when I watch obvious newbie players, who look like they have all the upper body strength to put a disc on the moon, spastically throw the crap out of a disc only to have it stall out and die inside of 200'.
            Last edited by Burge; June 14th, 2011, 09:06 AM. Reason: oops
            "When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." -- Jimi Hendrix

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Greg_R View Post
              Tip: Put all your drivers back into your bag and pull out a putter (Aviar, etc.) and head to the practice field. Throwing the putter for distance will quickly highlight form problems (plus it's nicer to play catch with). There are a number of things that could be going wrong; the likely suspects include speed (too fast/frantic), your grip, and wrist-rolling. Once you are smoothly cranking the putter over 200ft then give one of your midranges (Roc, etc.) a try. With good form, 300ft should not be a problem with the midrange.
              I usually do this myself at some point during the summer and work my way back to over-stable during the wet and windy winter. Noticing a change in discs about now anyway so It looks like it's that time of year again.
              FORE! Youth 2011 http://www.discgolfscene.com/tournam...RE_Youth_2011/

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              • #22
                Thanks everyone for good advice. Played a few rounds over the last couple days and my pain problem is resolved. I was putting too much of my grip on my one poor finger and I was using my left knee as a launch for my pivot.

                I'm still at 300', but at least I'm not in pain

                I will work on some of the distance suggestions here in the next week or so and report back.

                One question: Some one suggested wraiths as a good disc for someone in my range and I would have thought those better for someone who was throwing over 300' consistently. Would a wraith be good for me to learn from?

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                • #23
                  Work your way up... for the innova...
                  TeeBirds and leopards then valkyrie, viking and sidewinders, then beats and orcs... once you can control these discs accurately then go to the speed 11-13 discs...

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                  • #24
                    DX Wraiths/Valks. Use 'em up. Give 'em away. Love 'em while they're in your wheelhouse.
                    The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                    ...but it plays one on TV.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Knuckles Dakota View Post
                      One question: Some one suggested wraiths as a good disc for someone in my range and I would have thought those better for someone who was throwing over 300' consistently. Would a wraith be good for me to learn from?
                      I'd suggest that you stick with what you have and work purely on form. Get off the course and go find a soccer field or, better yet, a multi-purpose field with a track around it (like at a college or a high school), and spend an hour practicing drives. When you play a round, you get to practice 18 drives. An hour on the field will let you practice 50 to 100 drives -- depending on your stamina and the size of your bag. A field with a track is ideal because most tracks have distance markers that will let you accurately gauge your progress. Before you start, stretch stretch stretch. Throwing drive after drive is far more grueling than just playing a round. Then, start by trying to throw everything in your bag with the same throw at the same spot. Try to throw each disc, no matter what it is, with the the same method and force. This will not only let you see the limitations of each disc, but it will also let you see the limitations of your consistency. As you throw from one side of the field to the other, use a different throw for each time you empty your bag (i.e. all backhand, then all sidearm, then all backhand hyzer, then all tomahawk, then all sidearm anny, etc.). This will keep fatigue at bay and allow you to work on throws that you aren't comfortable with yet. It will also let you see what you can really do with each disc and build a solid foundation of versatility, which is the best skill to have on any course. Ever throw a tomahawk with your putter? Ever try to hyzer-flip your midrange out to 300'? Ever even try to throw a sidearm roller? Practicing on a field allows you to experiment and make mistakes that you can learn from without worrying about the consequences of blowing your score.

                      This is essentially what I did, 3 times a week for two years, so that I can now reach into my bag and know what each disc will do with each throw and how much I can squeeze out of it. Options, man...you've got to have options.
                      Last edited by Burge; June 15th, 2011, 09:35 AM.
                      "When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." -- Jimi Hendrix

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                      • #26
                        Burge, that was excellent advice. I will do that.

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                        • #27
                          Yeah, what's to argue about there?

                          I was every day for the first two years. I mowed a neighbor's field so I'd have a place to practice where nobody could see how bad I was. I was still losing discs off either side of a 200 foot wide area. Now I like the tight lines. It's where I make up for the strokes I pick up on the long holes.
                          The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                          ...but it plays one on TV.

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                          • #28
                            I stress field work more than any other aspect. The easiest way to gain distance is to get good form, and repeat it till you can do it in your sleep.
                            "Honest work is for the downtrodden and the Polish"
                            Cleveland Brown

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                            • #29
                              I've done it in my sleep and damned nearly hit the cat.
                              The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                              ...but it plays one on TV.

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                              • #30
                                I thought I'd type up a quick update on how my game is progressing. I've been following the advice given above and had some improvement in my throw. I'm really not getting anymore distance, but after changing up my grip and pulling later I've noticed that my drives have improved quite a bit. They now travel about 15' off the ground in a mostly straight line before fading off or turning to the right at the very end of their flight. I've been practicing on a foot ball field where I can measure my distance fairly accurately.

                                I have some new questions:

                                1. While my drives certainly look like they are flying on a better line thanks to improved technique they still won't break that 300' barrier. What happens is that they travel quite straight for about 200-250' start to turn or fade and look for all the world like they will just keep on going for another 100 feet or so and then at 280-290 (every time!) they just lose power and fall to the ground right in front of 300' like it's an invisible barrier. I think my best throws get about 295'. I'm using leopards, tee birds, a side winder, a stratus, and a valk. for practice. Is 300' with these discs on a long straight-ish path pretty typical? Should I be looking to throw higher with them to get the distance, working on hyzer flip with them, or something else I have not considered?

                                2. I've addressed the knee pain I mentioned and it's disappeared. I still occasionally get index knuckle pain. Feels a bit like a sprain which is frustrating because it keeps me from practicing as much as I'd like. I wonder if it's my grip? I often hear a POP when I throw. It does not sound like my finger snapping against my palm though. It feels like my finger is holding on to the very edge of the disc and as it leaves my hand there is a ( very satisfying i must admit) POP that occurs. could this be causing the pain?

                                Thanks to everyone who's been commenting, you've all been quite helpful.

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