Rotella's rules Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rotella's rules

    Winter time might be a good time to think about your mental game more. Establish a routine, develop a better attitude, maybe make a new years resolution on how you will approach your competition rounds next year. For example, maybe you can think of your three biggest mental shortcomings during competition and make it a resolution to concentrate on it next year. Maybe something like this: "In 2011, before every shot, I'm going to [think about] XX, YY, and ZZ." Or in shorthand, X-Y-Z. If you don't think you HAVE any shortcomings, ask your golfing buddies; they'll be happy to set you straight.

    The reason I'm posting is that a ball-golf friend loaned me "GOLF IS NOT A GAME OF PERFECT" last summer, and I typed up a summary, and it just now occurred to me that I can put the summary on this board. Some of these ideas I don't get, but many others are sound, and it should give you some idea of where you might want to concentrate your mental efforts next year.

    Rotella's rules in
    GOLF IS NOT A GAME OF PERFECT

    A person with great dreams can achieve great things.

    People by and large become what they think about themselves.

    Golfing potential depends primarily on attitude, skill with the wedges and the putter, and how well a golfer thinks. Great golfers are simply ordinary people thinking well and doing extraordinary deeds.

    Free will is a golfer's greatest source of strength and power. Choosing how to think is a crucial decision.

    Golfers who realize their potential generally cultivate the three D's desire, determination and discipline; the three P's persistence, patience and practice; and the three C's confidence, concentration and composure.

    There is no such thing as a golfer playing over his head. A hot streak is simply a glimpse of a golfer's true potential.

    A golfer must train herself in physical technique and then learn to trust what she's trained.

    Before playing any shot, a golfer must lock her eyes and mind into the smallest possible target.

    To score consistently, a golfer must think consistently. A sound, consistent pre-shot routine makes it easier.

    The correlation between thinking well and making successful shots is not 100%. But the correlation between thinking badly and unsuccessful shots is much higher.
    Golfers must learn to quiet their minds, stay in the present, and focus tightly on the next shot to be played.

    The loss of focus on four or five shots a round makes the difference between great golf and mediocre golf.

    A golfer must learn to enjoy the process of striving to improve the short game.

    Attitude makes a great putter.

    As ball-striking skills improve, it becomes a greater challenge to love putting and the short game and to maintain a positive attitude toward them.

    It is more important to be decisive than to be correct when preparing to play any golf shot, particularly a putt.

    Confidence is crucial to good golf. Confidence is simply the aggregate of the thoughts you have about yourself.

    A golfer cannot let the first few holes, shots, or putts determine his thinking for the rest of the round.

    A golfer should strive to be looser, freer, and more confident with every hole. This will combat the tendency to get tighter, more careful, and more doubtful.

    Being careful, tightening up, and trying to steer the ball will likely cause disaster. Good golfers gain control over the ball by feeling that they are giving up control.

    Golfers need selective memories, retaining the memory of great shots and forgetting bad ones. Selective memory helps a golfer grow in confidence as he gains experience and skill.

    Golf is a game played by human beings. Therefore, it is a game of mistakes.

    Successful golfers know how to respond to mistakes.

    Golfers must learn to love the challenge when they hit a ball into the rough, trees, or sand. The alternatives anger, fear, whining, and cheating do not good.

    Patience is a cardinal virtue in golf. To improve, a golfer must learn how to wait for practice and good thinking to bear fruit.

    ...a golfer must expect only two things of himself: to have fun, and to focus his mind properly on every shot.

    Players with great attitudes constantly monitor their thinking and catch themselves as soon as it begins to falter.

    A good competitor never allows herself to intensely dislike another player. She might be paired with her for an important round.

    The quality of a golfer's practice is more important than the quantity, particularly for better golfers.

    If a golfer chooses to compete, he must choose to believe that he can win. Winners and losers in life are completely self-determined, but only the winners are willing to admit it.

    Courage is a necessary quality in all champions. But an athlete cannot be courageous without first being afraid.

    In sport, the bad news for the present champion is that tomorrow is a new day, when the competition starts again from scratch But that's the good news for everyone else.

    On the course, golfers must have the confidence of a champion. But off the course, champions must remember that they are not more important than anyone else.

  • #2
    Nice post - Those are some words to live by out there. "Before playing any shot, a golfer must lock her eyes and mind into the smallest possible target." and "The correlation between thinking well and making successful shots is not 100%. But the correlation between thinking badly and unsuccessful shots is much higher.
    Golfers must learn to quiet their minds, stay in the present, and focus tightly on the next shot to be played." have been things I have been seriously working on to improve my putting. Which took me to a -1 at Milo last week. Which could have been better if I had followed this "
    A golfer should strive to be looser, freer, and more confident with every hole. This will combat the tendency to get tighter, more careful, and more doubtful.
    Being careful, tightening up, and trying to steer the ball will likely cause disaster. Good golfers gain control over the ball by feeling that they are giving up control." I tightened up and bogied 16,17 and 18. So now, I am working on this - "Golfers need selective memories, retaining the memory of great shots and forgetting bad ones. Selective memory helps a golfer grow in confidence as he gains experience and skill." I also like what he says about a "hot streak" or a dream round it is important to realize that that is the potential we have inside if we settle down and just play.

    Comment


    • #3
      "People by and large become what they think about themselves"

      A good coach of mine said a similar thing - "You will become what you think most often about yourself."

      Nice post. The mental side of disc golf and ball golf is the most similar part about the two games. There is a ton of information about the mental side of ball golf, but hardly any about disc golf. I'm sure alot of disc golfers could improve their game by reading some of the classic mental ball golf books. I know I need to.
      Read this ^

      Comment


      • #4
        Zen Golf.
        rewindb.com

        Comment


        • #5
          I was given the audio version of the book and have it on my mp3 player and every now and then I pull it up and just listen to a chapter or two.

          Comment


          • #6
            The State Champion has spoken!
            "I love it when a plan comes together" -John 'Hannibal' Smith

            Comment


            • #7
              I really enjoyed this. I am most certainly a mental golfer, though several of my companions decry my tendency to think so much. I think it is the only way to improve though.

              Many of these are gems, but I'll try to pick them up here and there, particularly about relaxing--becoming looser and freer and more confident as your round proceeds. This is so important in combination with focus. Thank you, kurtbayne!

              Comment


              • #8
                Fantastic post kurt. I have heard a lot of good things about that book but have not had the time to read it. Thanks.
                "What's in the bag", pdga #37977, dgcr #356, **Team Chainbanger'z**


                You are never really playing an opponent. You are playing yourself, your own highest standards, and when you reach your limits, that is real joy.
                -- Arthur Ashe

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ever wonder why the full shots come around faster then touch shots?

                  big muscles (full) vs Little muscles (touch) is the answer.

                  Hint on touch shots try and use more big muscles

                  in other words turn your hips or use a longer arm motion instead of just trying to flick it with your wrist


                  Papa you should review Ball Golf literature on this subject and then correlate it to DG for the Mag Granny already has nailed the Rotella mental approach for you.
                  rewindb.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I really dig all this mental game talk lately. I'm trying to use this winter to work on my mental game some more. I feel like I was a better mental player back when I was a worse golfer because my skills forced me to be more conservative. Now that I have the ability to make more shots and bang longer putts I have thrown caution to the wind and I often find myself creating bad rounds with a lack of focus.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Kurt Advice. Thank you.
                      Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man. - The Dude, 1998.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Touche, Mr. Bayne.

                        -G. Lyman

                        Comment

                        Announcement Announcement Module
                        Collapse
                        No announcement yet.
                        Working...
                        X