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  • #31
    Originally posted by olydiscgolf View Post
    I think walking paths are great obstacles for a disc golf course! Now granted safety issues need to be considered first before hole design, but I can think of a bunch of courses that use walking paths to narrow a fairway or outline a green. Walking paths create a permanent, well defined, in/out of bounds.
    Only if they make sense with the hole. Random OB in the middle of the fairway which penalizes good shots is useless IMO - sure, it "adds" difficulty in terms of strokes but not in terms of approaching a hole.

    A bad example of OB path would be Terrace hole #5 - it penalizes those who throw a pretty good shot at a fairly random interval

    A potentially* good example of OB path would be Seatac 18 (on or across!!!) - it punishes shots that fade out left, a common error for a RHBH thrower on the approach. Its not purely a randomizer error but one that punishes only poorly executed shots.

    My rant: Harder/More strokes does not = Better
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    • #32
      Originally posted by cefire View Post
      Only if they make sense with the hole. Random OB in the middle of the fairway which penalizes good shots is useless IMO - sure, it "adds" difficulty in terms of strokes but not in terms of approaching a hole.

      A bad example of OB path would be Terrace hole #5 - it penalizes those who throw a pretty good shot at a fairly random interval

      A potentially* good example of OB path would be Seatac 18 (on or across!!!) - it punishes shots that fade out left, a common error for a RHBH thrower on the approach. Its not purely a randomizer error but one that punishes only poorly executed shots.

      My rant: Harder/More strokes does not = Better
      Seatac was one of many courses that I was thinking about, that use walking paths wisely. The Geezer hole at Lakewood is another that is very well designed. Whiteriver has quite a few holes with paths that come into play. Trojan has quite a few. Random OB is no good. Using OB to penalize bad shots and reward good ones is good course design.
      A bad day on the golf course is better than a good day at work!

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      • #33
        Making sense is a definite plus.
        The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
        ...but it plays one on TV.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by olydiscgolf View Post
          I think walking paths are great obstacles for a disc golf course! Now granted safety issues need to be considered first before hole design, but I can think of a bunch of courses that use walking paths to narrow a fairway or outline a green. Walking paths create a permanent, well defined, in/out of bounds.
          I agree 100%. I can think of several courses that are played this way and int makes perfect sense. I was ranting about courses where only the path is OB, but over is OK. Greenway park is often played this way and it has never made any sense to me.

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          • #35
            Paths in the middle of fairways =

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            • #36
              Originally posted by The Course Bro View Post
              The out of bounds rule changes two years ago:
              Disc lands in area marked as OB but is resting against the rocks the define the border of the OB area but is inside the OB.
              Under the old rules the disc was NOT OB but is now OB. This is due to a change in status of the OB line from not OB to OB.

              803.09 Out-of-Bounds
              A. A disc shall be considered out-of bounds only when it comes to rest and it
              is clearly and completely surrounded by the out-of-bounds area. A disc thrown in water shall be deemed to be at rest once it is floating or is moving only by the action of the water or the wind on the water. See section 803.03 F. The out-of-bounds line itself is considered out-of-bounds.
              The way that I understand the rule that you can be touching the ob line and be in bounds but the line itself is now counted as part of OB instead of in bounds.
              This rule change barely comes into play because most of the time the OB line is just the grass to asphalt or a string which itself doesn't have much thickness. But if the OB line is a spray painted line then this could easily come into play.

              here is a pic of what I interpret the rule as.

              -Devin Cordell #38801

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              • #37
                Then the real line is the left red/white boundary plane. Once past that, everything is OB, red or white.

                And by the way, those green discs will probably get lost when not on the white or red. That's a tough color of green.
                Last edited by Ol' Bob; February 13th, 2010, 07:43 PM.
                The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                ...but it plays one on TV.

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                • #38
                  If any part of the disc is in bounds, the disc is in bounds, right?

                  Today on 22, I hit the grape vineyard deer fence, fell to the ground, and rolled under the OB fence a few inches before falling over. It was the only four feet where the fence was high enough to get a disc under. Grrrrrrrrrr! I was at even par and tied for the lead.
                  The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                  ...but it plays one on TV.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by loocid
                    Hmmm, so if the OB line is a fence, does touching the 'air' on either side of the fence count?
                    Fences were the main reason WHY the rule was changed.

                    When the OB Line was IN it created this problem.

                    Situation.....


                    Long hole with a chain link fence down the right side of the hole that is considered OB.

                    Golfer throws shot that flys over the fence into OB and then Hits fence on the outside falling on the OB side of the line. Technically this Disc has HIT the OB Line (which was considered IN BOUNDS) so even though he is still OB the disc could be marked at the point that it hit the fence and the player could proceed from there.
                    With the rule changeing to the line being OUT. The lie NOW has to be marked where the player last crossed the OB. Hence bringing stoke AND distance into play. The player could, of course, choose to play from his/her previous lie as well.

                    Confused yet?

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                    • #40
                      The concept of whether the line is in or out is dealt with by the rule of verticality, which describes the OB line as a vertical plane. A plane has only two dimensions and therefore, no thickness. The whole issue about whether the line is in bounds or not sort of goes away.

                      If rope or a painted line defines the OB area, the OB line would (most likely be) the fairway side of the line that has a measurable thickness, but I can't see any reason why a TD couldn't declare the OB side of the rope or line as being the vertical OB plane.

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                      • #41
                        but I can't see any reason why a TD couldn't declare the OB side of the rope or line as being the vertical OB plane.
                        There are actually two "lines" involved. There's the line/plane with no thickness at the interface between the OB area and IB area which truly splits OB from IB. However, in the context of the rules, there's also an "OB line" that sometimes has thickness whose edge on one side defines the true IB/OB line with no thickness. That OB line like a rope or paint with thickness will always be on the OB side of the true OB/IB interface line/plane.

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