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  • 10,000 hours of practice!

    ..
    Last edited by loocid; May 14th, 2011, 11:39 PM.

  • #2
    Lemme check my schedule.
    The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
    ...but it plays one on TV.

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    • #3
      I don't know, 10,000 hours is a lot. Isn't a prodigy some one who is world class without a lot of practice? If you practiced anything for 10,000 hours wouldn't you become at least close to world class even if you didn't have any natural talent.

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      • #4
        There are other factors at play as well. For example, quality of practice is extremely important. Two hours in the field and an hour of repetitive putting every day would be far more valuable than just heading to the course for casual rounds.

        Also important is what you are practicing. If you have bad form to begin with and practice that form for eight hours a day, will you still be at USDGC level in five years?

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        • #5
          All the hours there are won't bring back my rotator cuff. I think I'll work on my short game.
          The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
          ...but it plays one on TV.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BSTM View Post
            I don't know, 10,000 hours is a lot. Isn't a prodigy some one who is world class without a lot of practice?
            Clearly, the answer is no. It is always tempting to assume that those making a task look easy performed at that level from the very beginning. But research and studies by Gladwell as well as others have shown that talent and ability are only a small part of achieving excellence. Perhaps the greatest athlete/competitor of all time, Michael Jordan, is a prime example. Loads of talent, tons of ability, but to this day legendary for the effort and intensity that he brought to practice...every day! Let us never be tempted to credit anything but effort and consistency.

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            • #7
              I think some people are prodigies, in that their growth is more rapid. These are the guys that you see throwing 350' after playing for only a month or two. You see a very rapid rise to mediocrity (some of us have taken years to reach it ). But those that put in the crazy amount of practice and efforts are the only ones to become elite players.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by thadeouspage View Post
                Clearly, the answer is no. It is always tempting to assume that those making a task look easy performed at that level from the very beginning. But research and studies by Gladwell as well as others have shown that talent and ability are only a small part of achieving excellence. Perhaps the greatest athlete/competitor of all time, Michael Jordan, is a prime example. Loads of talent, tons of ability, but to this day legendary for the effort and intensity that he brought to practice...every day! Let us never be tempted to credit anything but effort and consistency.
                That was good.

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