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  • Your #1 tip for an intermediate player

    I've been playing disc golf consistently (2-3x/week) for about a year now. And while I've improved dramatically since I first started, I seem to have hit somewhat of a plateau.

    What is the one thing you started doing that pushed you to the next level when you were starting out?

  • #2
    Practicing in a field and spending time with my basket.

    Rounds are a whole lot of fun... but they are much more fun when you have mastered some basic skills... like throwing straight and putting well.
    ďI believe I can hit 18 greens, hit every fairway, you know ó Vision 54, which means you birdie every hole, thatís in the back of my mind. I want to putt better, chip better. That day when I hit 18 greens and one putt, Iíll know Iím a complete golfer. Will that ever happen? Iím not sure, but itís possible. The 54 vision is always in the back of my mind.Ē
    ~Annika SŲrenstam

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    • #3
      Research online for techniques and practicing on particular types of throws etc... Changing grips and discs...

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      • #4
        Read these articles http://www.discgolfreview.com/resources/articles.shtml

        Go out and practice what you read. Then reread and practice some more. Rinse, repeat.

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        • #5
          Taking a couple of lessons from a local pro like Nate Sexton. That really helped my game to the next level.

          Cindy
          Next Adventure Flight Crew Member
          2013 Chick Flick co-TD
          Stumptown #176
          PDGA #37716

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          • #6
            Get some pro advice and then practice, practice, practice. It would be best to learn correct techniques first, and then hit the fields for practice. Otherwise you will just be re-enforcing bad habits.

            And don't forget to practice all asepects of your game. Long bombs in the field are fun, but spend equal time on upshots and putting.

            And patience, grasshopper. We're all anxious to improve, but excellence takes time.

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            • #7
              Going to the field is a great way to take your game to the next level and if you are going to the course change it up throw shots you normaly would not throw and for sure play as many different courses to mix it up. i also make sure to just take at least a 1/2 hour at a basket to putt that has been my biggest help. I also have made sure to stick with the same disc trying something new is fun but you need to find what works for you and use it evrytime.

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              • #8
                I say grab a mid range/Putter and play catch with a buddy for a half hour before a round.

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                • #9
                  slow down, be smooth and balanced.
                  Click here

                  Challenge disc golf

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                  • #10
                    Minimize the molds and discs in your bag so you learn to throw them on all types of shots. Dave Feldberg carries 30+ discs on the course, but he also knows exactly what each and every one does, and could beat you, me, and most everyone else with just a putter.

                    Don't throw the ultrafast stuff (speed 11+ on Innova scale) unless you're consistently hitting 340+ with your fairway drivers on golf lines.

                    Try minimizing your bag to the bare minimum:

                    1 Putter
                    1-3 Midranges, slightly overstable to understable (try to use the same mold in different stages of wear for all mid shots, Buzzzes, Rocs, and Warriors are good for this)
                    1 Fairway driver
                    1 Overstable driver for fighting wind and skipping
                    1 Moderately overstable driver for all around utility and accurate long throws (SOLF, Avenger, and PD are good examples of this type of disc)
                    1 Distance Driver (use something easy to throw and glidey for max distance, like a Valkyrie, TL, Avenger SS, Assassin, or Striker)
                    1 Understable driver (can usually double as a max distance driver)


                    Sticking to this formula will really help you learn what you and your discs can do when combined with field practice. Adding multiples of the same mold will generally benefit you a lot more than adding more molds, as you know exactly how that disc will throw and you will have backups for the inevitable lost discs.
                    We're at our best when it's from our hips

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                    • #11
                      Understand that sometimes you'll have to go backwards to jump forwards. If you find potential problems with your form, be willing to gain some strokes while you practice the new corrections. If you're stuck at a level, it might take giving something up that you're used to for something better. You've got years to work on it. Maybe that's what winters are for.
                      The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                      ...but it plays one on TV.

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                      • #12
                        All the advice here is great, one more idea might be playing many different courses, and mixing up how you play your home courses. I'll also heartily second the advice of minimizing your bag, I used to try a new disc every month, then 2 years ago I picked 6 molds and stuck to just mastering those molds and using variations in weight and plastic to achieve different flights, so my avengers can work as my overstable straight and understable driver.
                        PDGA: #32726 rating: 930 StumptownDG: #31, Trojan Nation: Tag# 06
                        dgcoursereview.com profile: http://www.dgcoursereview.com/profile.php?id=376

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                        • #13
                          There are lots of videos online. Watch as many great players as you can. You will notice their routines and throwing styles vary but they all look pretty similar from their last two or three steps to the time they release the disc. Try to pick out the little things that you see are common among the top players such as footwork, pull back, hip turn weight shift, follow through and examine your own motion to see if you are doing the same things the same way. Try to slowly put the things you are missing or do differently into your motion and practice it over and over again using the exact same pre shot routine for every practice shot, practice round, and tournament round. Keep things as simple, smooth, and easy to repeat as possible.
                          Read this ^

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jevon View Post
                            Read these articles http://www.discgolfreview.com/resources/articles.shtml

                            Go out and practice what you read. Then reread and practice some more. Rinse, repeat.
                            Thanks for the link. Good reading.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by REDFIVE View Post
                              slow down, be smooth and balanced.
                              This man knows what he's talking about, after taking a lesson I went from sucking really bad to about average. No really my game has improved drastically.
                              Sometimes my mind boggles. It's so deep my mind actually boggles.

                              ~ Cyndi Lauper ~

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