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    DGrs,I have a question about throwing anhyzers. I am currently able to throw them with putters and most midrange discs the problem I am having is trying to throw fairway drivers and keeping them on the correct angle so that I can keep that right turn going. I have been practicing a lot this week with 175g eagles(2 are beat) and a teebird(glow 175g fairly new). I am able to flip sidewinders on the angle I throw at but it is to severe of right turn and flies usually to far out to the right with no fade back. I have now confused myself while typing this so if anyone has any tips that they care to share it would be appreciated.
    The Frisbee is the mirror to the soul.

    -M. Burns

  • #2
    Try lighter discs, and make sure they get pretty beat in.

    Comment


    • #3
      This is something that you are going to have to perfect on your own. We can give you tips like "arch your back a little" or "raise your arm angle as it comes through to the hit" but you are the one in control of the amount of force you bring your arm through, the angle of your wrist, the amount of snap you put on the throw, etc.

      My best advice is to take all of your discs out to the field and try to throw them all on an anny line until you find the right combination of force/snap/angle to achieve the results you are looking for. These three things should be your focus - trying different things over and over until the desired flight path is achieved.

      Good luck. I love me some annys.
      ďI believe I can hit 18 greens, hit every fairway, you know ó Vision 54, which means you birdie every hole, thatís in the back of my mind. I want to putt better, chip better. That day when I hit 18 greens and one putt, Iíll know Iím a complete golfer. Will that ever happen? Iím not sure, but itís possible. The 54 vision is always in the back of my mind.Ē
      ~Annika SŲrenstam

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Sam View Post
        This is something that you are going to have to perfect on your own. We can give you tips like "arch your back a little" or "raise your arm angle as it comes through to the hit" but you are the one in control of the amount of force you bring your arm through, the angle of your wrist, the amount of snap you put on the throw, etc.

        My best advice is to take all of your discs out to the field and try to throw them all on an anny line until you find the right combination of force/snap/angle to achieve the results you are looking for. These three things should be your focus - trying different things over and over until the desired flight path is achieved.

        Good luck. I love me some annys.
        I love me some anny's as well just wish they were easier to throw with the fairway and long distance drivers. I will be hitting up the field again today and work on what you suggested
        The Frisbee is the mirror to the soul.

        -M. Burns

        Comment


        • #5
          LEOPARD! LEOPARD! LEOPARD!
          FIELD PRACTICE! FIELD PRACTICE! FIELD PRACTICE!
          It just seems that the discs you are trying to throw are not the right discs for the shot you want. You can make the leopard turn and it will fight a bit but should stay turned.

          You could also throw your sidewinder with less anhyzer angle and let it turn instead of forcing it over.

          There is a large difference between the eagle/teebird and a sidewinder and they need to be thrown differently to do the same thing. The leopard is inbetween these discs and could be what you are looking for. I recomend hittingthe field and learning the discs when thrown flat. Starting there you can do whatever you want.

          Good luck!
          Click here

          Challenge disc golf

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          • #6
            going from a sidewinder to a glow teebird is a big gap in the middle... Valkyrie and leopard come to mind....

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by REDFIVE View Post
              LEOPARD! LEOPARD! LEOPARD!
              FIELD PRACTICE! FIELD PRACTICE! FIELD PRACTICE!
              It just seems that the discs you are trying to throw are not the right discs for the shot you want. You can make the leopard turn and it will fight a bit but should stay turned.

              You could also throw your sidewinder with less anhyzer angle and let it turn instead of forcing it over.

              There is a large difference between the eagle/teebird and a sidewinder and they need to be thrown differently to do the same thing. The leopard is inbetween these discs and could be what you are looking for. I recomend hittingthe field and learning the discs when thrown flat. Starting there you can do whatever you want.

              Good luck!
              I love the slow distance turn I get from a sidewinder thrown basically level but with a great amount of snap.

              Comment


              • #8
                Discs aside, remember that a flat level shot goes level, a shot that starts low and finishes higher, hyzers, and a shot that starts high and finishes lower goes annie. The degrees needed vary by player, ability and disc.
                educate your thinking

                Comment


                • #9
                  I love a beat up valkyrie for long anheyser shots, but what about throwing a forehand hyzer. Learning a good any can take a while, but a forehand has a real similar outcome and usually pretty comfortable for new players.
                  A bad day on the golf course is better than a good day at work!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JMan View Post
                    Discs aside, remember that a flat level shot goes level, a shot that starts low and finishes higher, hyzers, and a shot that starts high and finishes lower goes annie. The degrees needed vary by player, ability and disc.
                    What he said.

                    Up angle, fighting gravity. Harder to maintain airspeed. Slows down and hyzers out.

                    Down angle, gravity assist. Easier to maintain airspeed. Speeds along and annies out.

                    Big arms help with big annies. If you're not a big arm (like me), you can't expect a long annie shot to hold on. Any time you are turning right, or left, you are giving up vertical lift and the aerodynamics of the disc (rotary wing). I wish I could power those annie shots out there, but I can't. My 275 foot drive becomes a 235 foot drive when I turn it right.
                    The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                    ...but it plays one on TV.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ol' Bob View Post
                      What he said.

                      Up angle, fighting gravity. Harder to maintain airspeed. Slows down and hyzers out.

                      Down angle, gravity assist. Easier to maintain airspeed. Speeds along and annies out.

                      Big arms help with big annies. If you're not a big arm (like me), you can't expect a long annie shot to hold on. Any time you are turning right, or left, you are giving up vertical lift and the aerodynamics of the disc (rotary wing). I wish I could power those annie shots out there, but I can't. My 275 foot drive becomes a 235 foot drive when I turn it right.
                      i am throw hyzer. hyzer good. annie bad!!

                      sarcasm off... I would actually suggest going to the slower less stable discs for an anhyzer. tbh i use a roc for my turnover driver so im probably not the best to comment about that.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I pick a less stable disc, the steeper the climb of the shot. I'm just pointing out how much the up attitude affects the turnover. What flips going downhill, won't flip so much going level, and maybe not at all going uphill. Add a little wind and... Well, you know. This isn't as simple as I thought.
                        The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                        ...but it plays one on TV.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Annies that don't come back are very hard with drivers. I'm stuborn and don't want to sidearm so I've been trying very hard to perfect the annie. I think its way more fun throwing annies than sidearm. I have a very old 172 11X KCpro eagle that I can throw annies with some consistency. Try to pick one disc and stick with it for your annies. It takes perfect angle/height along with knowing exactly what the disc is going to do to get driver annies working right.

                          If you're able to throw good annies with midranges and putters you're coming along very well. It will probably take you a couple years to perfect the driver annie. If I have a tall ceiling on an annie hole I'll try to pump a roc out as hard as I can. If you have a good arm you can learn how to throw rocs about 350ft.

                          Good luck and don't forget to have fun with it.

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                          • #14
                            There is a new discraft clinic about anhyzers on youtube. Can't post the link from my phone right now but a simple search should yield results.
                            Click here

                            Challenge disc golf

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