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  • #16
    There is only one shot - the one you are about to make. The shots that happened before are gone and nothing short of an eraser is going to change that.
    It's not nice bringing Brill into this conversation, Sam.

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    • #17
      there is only one shot - the one you are about to make. The shots that happened before are gone and nothing short of an eraser is going to change that.

      Originally posted by bruce View Post
      it's not nice bringing brill into this conversation, sam.
      OH SNAP.......
      "In Discatarianism We Trust"

      :cheers:

      :cool:sigpic

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      • #18
        Originally posted by NWDiscer View Post
        OH SNAP.......

        Pat I gotta say your game is sick! We have been carded up together lots of times the last couple years and I have only seen you improve. The problem is you play with one of the top players in the state and set your expectations to the Kid's level of play. While I believe you are completely capable of being a top player some day, give yourself some credit for how good you already are. Set some tournament goals that are reasonable and you will likely exceed them. Most athletes never play in competition as well as they play in casual. I think you have excelled far past what you realize. keep hammering away at it and practice with intention. Gilmore taught me that every shot in practice is equally as important as every shot in a tournament. You don't have a head problem anymore. Once you recognize that, you will be slaying the intermediate field. You got game Dawg.
        Training to be a bagger

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        • #19
          Wow, head game, I hear you, that's always been one of the biggest problems in my game. I've even seen it turn great rounds into average ones by simply letting my mind run away from me. J-Man might be able to recall a Sunday a ways back where I started off -4 at Pier through 7 holes, only to overthink the score and my own game and finish at +3, thoroughly disappointed. Many of my strongest rounds have been solo rounds at Pier with no one around where I practically jog from hole to hole, rarely stopping to think to much. My best tournament rounds simply come when I just try to think less in general, or keep my mind away from the game except for when I'm standing right over the disc. One odd strategy I picked up for tournament putting ion the shorter distances is when I'm feeling nervous I would pace out the distance to the basket and remind myself "this is just a 21 foot putt, you're great at these, and think to the many 21 foot practice putts I've made. Just trying to keep everything in perspective is my only advice, see each shot as its own entity separate from all the rest.

          Now if only I could do that during all my pressure packed middle of the intermediate field rounds I play maybe I'd win one some day
          PDGA: #32726 rating: 930 StumptownDG: #31, Trojan Nation: Tag# 06
          dgcoursereview.com profile: http://www.dgcoursereview.com/profile.php?id=376

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          • #20
            My advice if you want to be really focused is start by NOT drinking or smoking pot. Also, listen to a catchy song before your round and get it stuck in your head. I always sing in my head or listen to music to help get my mind off a bad shot.

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            • #21
              Before I throw my first shot. I believe that I can execute any shot needed for that round. That includes all the worst shots and the recoveries shots. Now when I find something I can't execute it gives me something to work on.

              I remember an old golf adage "You can recover from bad drive but never a bad second".

              I also see and hear DG say... "I see the perfect shot" But they lack the skill to execute it. The idea is to find a shot you can execute not just the perfect shot. I also have noticed a difference between DG and BG. In the rough DG look to throw the shot through the window and onto the green. BG will look at the same shot, decide they can't execute it and just play out to the fairway and take their stroke "Course management".

              There is something to be said about playing your own bag too.
              rewindb.com

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              • #22
                To be able to come back from getting down on yourself you have to be aware when you are doing it. Once you are aware that you are being negative you can again become positive. It is very easy to let one bad shot turn into 3 or 4. Take mistakes lightheartedly because they are unavoidable. Just move on, focus on the good shotS you had made prior to the mistake and you will find that focussed mind set. Up until one bad shot or one unlucky kick there were more good shots or lucky kicks to focus on. if that is what you are focussing on that is what you will percieve and that is what you will get more of. Good golf takes a cup half full mentallity. The only time to reflect is after a round when you can look at the whole.

                RESEARCH QUANTUM PHYSICS.
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                Challenge disc golf

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                • #23
                  Another good piece of advice or two...

                  Don't aim at the basket... aim for the spot in space that your disc has to go through halfway (about 100 - 150 ft off of the tee) to get to the basket... That way you are thinking about execution and not results...

                  Know what is good enough... (preface with I'm a PRO) You don't have to be under a basket to hole out... I often aim upshots 20 or even 30 feet offline to get an easier approach and then trust myself to make the putt... Why throw the impossible line to get an extra 15 ft. closer that you don't need.

                  Don't throw until your sure... If you are still thinking about your score, or your attitude, or your last shot... step away and let it go and then go back and focus on executing this shot... The decipline to actually step off the tee and re-focus will teach your body to avoid this kind of thinking. This is something that you see from almost all of the greats in our sport... they will not throw a shot until they are good and ready and positive that they are choosing the best shot for the situation.

                  I would second the no beer and pot thing... In a casual round they can enhance the joy of a sunny day... but in a tournament they interfere with your ability to control your emotions and thoughts and will make your lows lower for sure.

                  Remember... the winner of the tournament is not usually the guy with the most birdies... it's often the guy with the least bogies... never give up on any hole... learn something every time you go out and remember it's supposed to be fun!

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                  • #24
                    Knowing when to accept the par and make a wise tee shot so that the par is still a good goal. I've seen too many players in the intermediate level make shots that are just not common sense shots and costs them par right away. I know I make a few but I recognize and improve on it for the next opportunity. At De laveaga last weekend, I was able to see alot of throws that were just not common sense at all and cost them at least 1-2 more strokes. Classic example was a guy about 75 feet from the pin, sloping left to right down hill, 2 trees in the the way but are about 2-3 feet apart around 30 feet away. I would have just taken the easy hyzer around these trees, park the upshot and take the par and walk away. The guy goes for it between the trees and hits a tree and still has a 30+ par putt to make with the slope still a factor. Then another guy is like 45 feet from a basket that gets par'ed 1 out of 5 times or so, the guy was like oh darn thought he was a little closer, I was like, take the 3 and be happy bro. He goes for the jump putt, sails past it about 25 feet under a tree, misses the comeback, now he got a 4 and his beautiful drive off the tee is wasted. Too many players can't swallow their pride and know when to go for the bird and when to take the par and move on...

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by DexterHawk View Post
                      I would second the no beer and pot thing... In a casual round they can enhance the joy of a sunny day... but in a tournament they interfere with your ability to control your emotions and thoughts and will make your lows lower for sure.
                      I would also encourage some stimulant-free practice rounds once in a while. I've been in tournaments with guys that complain all round long that they can't spark up and that throws off their game.

                      Allong those lines - make your practice rounds feel as much like your tournament rounds as possible. This tricks your brain into thinking that everything is normal come tournament time.

                      I use to totally tailspin out of control once I would have a few bad holes in a row. Now, I'm most proud of the point when I pull myself out of that tailspin - string together a few pars or birdies.

                      Finally, when things go poorly I remind myself over and over: "I'm throwing a Frisbee in a park. I'm throwing a Frisbee in a park. I'm throwing a Frisbee in a park." It helps me regain perspective.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Scott View Post
                        Finally, when things go poorly I remind myself over and over: "I'm throwing a Frisbee in a park. I'm throwing a Frisbee in a park. I'm throwing a Frisbee in a park." It helps me regain perspective.
                        This one works well for me.
                        "Operator! Give me the number for 911! " - Homer S.

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                        • #27
                          A couple of quick comments

                          The Bagger Vance reference. Juna had skills before the WWI and was trying to rediscover them despite the Personal trauma he experienced. Granted these ideas work for any instance of rediscovery.

                          Dave and I were talking about practice putting recently.
                          How many of you believe putting practice ends when you let it go?

                          It's actually towards the end but not it. Seeing the disc go in, hearing the sound it makes, ACTUALLY retrieving the disc from the basket returning and picking up your marker. It's all about visualization. Same with off the tee see the entire shot pre shot, release, 1st 1/3, middle, finish. Walking out to it.

                          Here is an idea the next time you play your favorite course don't play for score. Play to see and execute each shot. What I mean is If you have abad throw keep throwing the shot till you actually see it, Both as practice and as positive visualization. Same when you play with your friends Watch each lie, shot etc they play and see if you would play it the same way.
                          rewindb.com

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                          • #28
                            Added thought If you think" right at that tree" 250' in front of you and you hit it Congratulate yourself for executing the throwing you visualized. It's pretty good to actually hit what you want too. Then think "just miss that tree"
                            rewindb.com

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                            • #29
                              dont look past the shot you at now, focus on the line, where you want to put it
                              IMO this is the key. Do not throw the shot until you see it in your mind successfully. I try to equate the shot to some other course that I'm very familiar with (i.e. 215ft upshot = hole 1 at Orchard, etc.).

                              There are a lot of other keys to success but we're just talking about how to focus right now...

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Greg_R View Post
                                I try to equate the shot to some other course that I'm very familiar with (i.e. 215ft upshot = hole 1 at Orchard, etc.).

                                this a very good key to be able to use
                                "In Discatarianism We Trust"

                                :cheers:

                                :cool:sigpic

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