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  • Anyone else find groups of 9 annoying?

    Today at Shelton (my home course where I like to try and get a quick round in once in a while even though it takes 20 minutes for me to get there) I had to deal with groups of 10, 9, and 7. Seriously. what is that about? the group of 9 was incredibly annoying as people who I've seen play there decided it was not pertinent to let a single go through (many in the groups did not seem to be locals...which is fine, doesn't matter anyway! etiquette knows no boundaries!) . On hole 3, I had to wait nearly 5 minutes to tee off...another 5 AT LEAST to take my second and then waited for every player except one to tee off on 4 (while I was in clear view waiting to the side) before someone asked, "you guys wanna play through?" guys? really? you stared at me standing in the fairway 20 feet behind you all by myself...what the hell. meanwhile a couple in your group took 7 shots to finish a par 4 (playing doubles!!!) . when you have a group double the appropriate size or more, you should allow a SINGLE TO GO THROUGH IMMEDIATELY! I let twos go through when i'm in a group of 3. it's one thing for it to be busy, but another for there to be 26 people on three holes and none on the rest.

    it's an etiquette thing...something that seems to be going by the wayside in multiple ways as I've read in other threads.

    Am I just crazy or is this just wrong? how do you all deal with this and not feel like an ass asking to go through?...which I wouldn't do.
    "When a ball dreams, it dreams it is a frisbee."

  • #2
    Originally posted by ski2man View Post
    Today at Shelton (my home course where I like to try and get a quick round in once in a while even though it takes 20 minutes for me to get there) I had to deal with groups of 10, 9, and 7. Seriously. what is that about? the group of 9 was incredibly annoying as people who I've seen play there decided it was not pertinent to let a single go through (many in the groups did not seem to be locals...which is fine, doesn't matter anyway! etiquette knows no boundaries!) . On hole 3, I had to wait nearly 5 minutes to tee off...another 5 AT LEAST to take my second and then waited for every player except one to tee off on 4 (while I was in clear view waiting to the side) before someone asked, "you guys wanna play through?" guys? really? you stared at me standing in the fairway 20 feet behind you all by myself...what the hell. meanwhile a couple in your group took 7 shots to finish a par 4 (playing doubles!!!) . when you have a group double the appropriate size or more, you should allow a SINGLE TO GO THROUGH IMMEDIATELY! I let twos go through when i'm in a group of 3. it's one thing for it to be busy, but another for there to be 26 people on three holes and none on the rest.

    it's an etiquette thing...something that seems to be going by the wayside in multiple ways as I've read in other threads.

    Am I just crazy or is this just wrong? how do you all deal with this and not feel like an ass asking to go through?...which I wouldn't do.
    I feel a 5-some is the max. When you have 9 friends that want to go play golf, split up and have fun. I play by myself all the time, and I have no problem asking to play through. I usually wait for a hole or two, and then i'll "offer" to play through. Just be respectful, and you'll find most people will oblige.
    PDGA #42116

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    • #3
      Who do these people think they are?! DGOD?! Wait...



      Having now read this... we NEVER put 26 people on three holes. We generally put that many on two holes. Generally. But we ALWAYS let people play through. That's just silly to make smaller groups wait.
      ďI believe I can hit 18 greens, hit every fairway, you know ó Vision 54, which means you birdie every hole, thatís in the back of my mind. I want to putt better, chip better. That day when I hit 18 greens and one putt, Iíll know Iím a complete golfer. Will that ever happen? Iím not sure, but itís possible. The 54 vision is always in the back of my mind.Ē
      ~Annika SŲrenstam

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      • #4
        I believe when teaching disc golf or introducing newbies to the game, etiquette is the FIRST thing that needs to be discussed and practiced. Learning how to properly throw a disc can wait but new players must learn how to be courteous. I hate large groups of rude, entitled players who are not courteous and are not even decent players but see no problem being disrespectful.

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        • #5
          One of the things I love about Disc Golf is all the different type of people the game brings to the Course.


          With that said; Do you remember the first time you played? How long after you started playing did you learn the nuances of etiquette? Who taught you about etiquette (I'm assuming not many of us Disc Golfers showed up at the Course the first time and had etiquette down and in the forethought of our round)?

          I'm not trying to devalue your frustration; I definitely know what it's like to sneak in a quick round (working full-time, father of 3, with one on the way, and the Oly-to-Shelton thing) and be pressed for time. I would not have a problem speaking up and asking to play through. 9 times out of 10 this is going to result in a chorus of "yeah"s and "sure"s. The rest of the time I suggest grace. Yeah, grace. That thing where you let it be and skip a hole or start taking your time playing the hole your on, because "what's the point? I'm going to have to wait for them to hole-out." Someone who asks to play through is not an "ass", IMO. But then again, does it really matter that someone thinks that you're an "ass", even if it's just for a little while (or how ever long it takes for you to hole out!)? Recently, I thought about walking up the gravel service road and starting at one of the back (holes 15-18) just to give some space between groups. Nobody likes to feel rushed, especially during a "casual" round.

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          • #6
            I hear you brother. Max 5 and that can sometimes be too much. However, me and my friends travel 30 miles just to play and we want to get two rounds in. Sometimes it's great but all the local guys just "hangin around" (who prob do it everyday) just join up slowing the pace dramatically. I know my friends and I are a great time to play with but sometimes I feel like a d*ck sayin' "na I'd rather just keep the pace" especially if we're half way through a round and someone is playing really good golf. It can really mess with the rythm. I understand how beginners don't quite understand etiquitte but these people are seasoned and just don't have it. I will always let people play through and think that it is a huge part of the game, not only knowing whos turn it is in your group but the way that the field is playing. I consider myself being very cordial on the course but have to constantly deal with people not so. Frustrating.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by KG_MCDGC View Post
              One of the things I love about Disc Golf is all the different type of people the game brings to the Course.


              With that said; Do you remember the first time you played? How long after you started playing did you learn the nuances of etiquette? Who taught you about etiquette (I'm assuming not many of us Disc Golfers showed up at the Course the first time and had etiquette down and in the forethought of our round)?

              I'm not trying to devalue your frustration; I definitely know what it's like to sneak in a quick round (working full-time, father of 3, with one on the way, and the Oly-to-Shelton thing) and be pressed for time. I would not have a problem speaking up and asking to play through. 9 times out of 10 this is going to result in a chorus of "yeah"s and "sure"s. The rest of the time I suggest grace. Yeah, grace. That thing where you let it be and skip a hole or start taking your time playing the hole your on, because "what's the point? I'm going to have to wait for them to hole-out." Someone who asks to play through is not an "ass", IMO. But then again, does it really matter that someone thinks that you're an "ass", even if it's just for a little while (or how ever long it takes for you to hole out!)? Recently, I thought about walking up the gravel service road and starting at one of the back (holes 15-18) just to give some space between groups. Nobody likes to feel rushed, especially during a "casual" round.
              I see what you're saying, none of these groups were full of newbies though. The group of 10 I beat to the second tee, and the group of 7 let me through right away. I think I've always known the etiquette of playing through and other unwritten rules just because I grew up playing ball golf, not all have that at the start I know. That being said, most people realize that when it's taking you and your buddies 15 minutes per hole and there is a single person behind you...let them go on through. As far as etiquette in the disc golf world, this seems pretty basic. I suppose some people never play by themselves though and don't have this experience from the single's point of view.
              I always try to have "grace" while playing by myself. I know it's a basically people doing me a favor to let me through. I always play two discs, not throw up on people, slow down, do some extra putts when I'm behind a group of 2-5. I guess when I see I'm behind a group of 8-9 I get anxious and agitated and don't want to do the extra throws because I know it will take my whole bag. I just sit behind and watch and hope someone will be nice enough to say "go ahead."

              I do often start on other holes, it's good practice for tournaments anyway, or skip sometimes... but after you do it the last 5 rounds you've gone you sometimes just wanna play a full, normal round.
              Last edited by ski2man; February 11th, 2013, 07:22 AM.
              "When a ball dreams, it dreams it is a frisbee."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dricks View Post
                I consider myself being very cordial on the course but have to constantly deal with people not so. Frustrating.
                I think I have this problem with every day life as well, and it's getting to me I guess. Glad people understand. I wish disc golf was immune to it.

                Time to move to a cave in a mountain and become a hermit. I'll make my mountain course out of wooden "tone poles" so to speak and play it every day while living off of little green plants and squirrel. No one will bother me there!
                "When a ball dreams, it dreams it is a frisbee."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ski,

                  I hadn't really experienced running into much "mob golf" around Westsound, but perhaps like you had always heard of the phenomenon.

                  Then I had the chance to spend a weekend in Santa Cruz and got in several days at Delaveaga.

                  On Sunday starting at 11:00 it appeared... The infamous mob golf groups. I said to myself... "It does exist... wow... yupp - 9 dudes, 2 girlfriends, 3 dogs (one being carried, and two off leash), and three coolers.. wow".

                  The interesting factor to it faded quickly when I realized that it wasn't just one mob... there was two or three others getting ready to follow them.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    One thing I think we should be doing about this problem to be proactive in a positive way is to start offering free information and skills clinics at your home course. Pick a Saturday, get a flyer up at the course, round up a few local golfers or club members and start educating the public. This can be done in a low key, polite and even fun way -- get a sponsor to offer some swag to the people. A couple folks can offer skills instruction off to the side, while a couple others are at the first tee to explain what you're trying to do.

                    Stuff like etiquette and care of the course can be covered and you can answer people's questions, etc. Environmental degradation is also a serious problem at a lot of courses. You can tell people that doing this kind of stuff will help show the parks department that disc golfers care about the park and will help make sure the course will last for years.

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                    • #11
                      because i play by myself i end up playing thru groups quite a bit... i usually try to establish some kind of contact before i ask to play through... eye contact when i walk up to the tee, smile, friendly wave if the group in front of me notices me waiting on the tee... that way we are all warmed up to have some kind of interaction... sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't... my fave was a few months ago at horning's when a group of 7 wouldn't let me play through... because there was another group in front of them. i totally bitched out at them (oops) and was like, "is it because i'm a girl??" and then also mentioned they were teaching really excellent etiquette to the young boy they had in their group... i skipped ahead a hole... almost aced it, then the group in front of them let me play through and i proceeded to birdie most of the other holes, i circled back to the hole i had skipped, just being finished by the big group, and was like, "yeah... that really would have slowed you down to let me play through, huh?" and then parked that one, too. they didn't appreciate me one little bit... but i hope it helped them to learn in the long run that it's okay to let people play through. i admit, tho, not my finest moment, but at the same time pretty satisfying.

                      i really do think it's rude to play in a group more than 6... and only 6 if it's pretty competent players who are going to move along at a good clip. you've really got to consider the other people who are using the course, too... if you are gonna play in a herd... pay attention and take the responsibility to be aware and step aside for the smaller groups.

                      on another note, someone mentioned when people want to join up... this happens to me, also... and i've come up with the statement, "naw, not today. today i'm working." it's legit and doesn't make people feel bad that i don't want to play with them... because, i know, i am so very cool that everyone wants to play with me, right?
                      "'There are two mantras.,' Bernard said, 'Yum and yuk. Mine is yum.'"
                      Tom Robbins, Still Life With Woodpecker

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        We have had a lot of positive comments on the secondary tee signs we put up at Blue Lake.

                        In addition to the actual tee sign we have another space where we've put things like...

                        * In the interest of speed of play, please keep group sizes to 5 or fewer players.
                        * Trash Barrels every few holes.. Pack it in Pack it out.
                        * We are guests in this neighborhood. Please conduct yourselves accordingly.
                        * This is an alcohol free park.

                        While this will obviously not work 100% of the time, it does inform people that what they might think is perfectly fine... is in fact... not perfectly fine. Passively informing people of the rules makes it a little easier to enforce those rules when necessary.

                        The best thing we all can do is lead by example, and politely educate new players. When I say politely, I really mean it. If we're not cordial when approaching people it will backfire on us 9 times
                        out of 10.

                        Jeff
                        "You won't like me when I am angry, because I always back up my rage with facts and documented sources". - The Credible Hulk

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                        • #13
                          At Pier most of the larger groups I run into are experienced tournament players. Chances are some of them post here. I think some of the recent disc golf issues I have heard about that plague courses are propagated by experienced players. Most of the time when I run into new players they are happy to hear about the basic etiquette as long as I am not preachy about it. I think there is a need for experienced players to take a moment and re-evaluate the image they really portray to non-experienced players.
                          "Love is not primarily a relationship to a specific person. Love is an attitude, an ordination of character which determines the relatedness of the person to the whole world as a whole, not toward one object of love.Ē

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                          • #14
                            When I'm playing with Matthew we find groups (even groups of 3-4) are often very reluctant to let us play through, presumably because they don't want to get stuck behind a kid. The best part is when they finally do let us play through and he outdrives everyone on their card.

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                            • #15
                              I play in a group of nine occasionally. We are always courteous to people who want to play through. I don't think we should be putting a maximum group size limit out there, especially on public courses- I think the problem lies more with etiquette. If you are slower than the group behind (regardless of numbers), always let them through as soon as possible.

                              It is also our responsibility to educate people to proper etiquette- maybe the OP could have asked the group if he could play through quickly. It takes a real douche to say no.

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