Anyone else find groups of 9 annoying? Page Title Module
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  • WestsoundBT
    replied
    I know I've posted this link before on this NW forum, but its such a great match.

    http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/2012/j...#axzz2KjZNInGY

    Yeah, It's a ball golf article about the Gold Mountain course in Bremerton, WA. BUT... it shows the nature of "slow play" and how even with a huge staffing of dedicated paid marshals, it can still be tough to "keep it moving".

    -interesting if you read it and substitute "Disc Golf" mentally into your reading. Then read the after article comments. You can't win!

    Leave a comment:


  • Adam Schneider
    replied
    I often play alone, and I always ask to play through. I don't think anyone has said "no" yet.

    After I throw my drive, I usually sprint down the fairway and don't bother with "gimme" putts, so they don't have to wait very long for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • CarlitosBonitos
    replied
    A suggestion...

    I play quite a bit of 45 minute rounds during my hour long lunch breaks... when I come on a group, be it 2 or 12 players, I just ask "Hey would you guys mind if I throw this hole with you so I can get ahead?" I have always either been told "sure," or go ahead and play through... Basically be proactive.

    Leave a comment:


  • prettyboyfloyd
    replied
    Originally posted by Bullseye View Post
    We have had a lot of positive comments on the secondary tee signs we put up at Blue Lake.

    In addition to the actual tee sign we have another space where we've put things like...

    * In the interest of speed of play, please keep group sizes to 5 or fewer players.
    * Trash Barrels every few holes.. Pack it in Pack it out.
    * We are guests in this neighborhood. Please conduct yourselves accordingly.
    * This is an alcohol free park.

    While this will obviously not work 100% of the time, it does inform people that what they might think is perfectly fine... is in fact... not perfectly fine. Passively informing people of the rules makes it a little easier to enforce those rules when necessary.

    The best thing we all can do is lead by example, and politely educate new players. When I say politely, I really mean it. If we're not cordial when approaching people it will backfire on us 9 times
    out of 10.

    Jeff
    Just played Blue Lake for the first time the other day and, yes, I love the "limit your groups to 5" sign (Is that on the 1st tee? It should be). That course would be horrible following a group of 9.

    Related to the annoying large group, is the large group who lets you play though on a tee and you still have to wait for the group in front of them to finish the hole. One time, one of the guys in the group that let me play through told me to "go ahead and throw". I gave him the " Would you want to get hit by this (holding a Destroyer)?" / "You always let the group finish the hole" - lecture. That pissed me right off and I then proceeded to park the hole.

    That being said, 90-95% of all folks I've run into have be overwhelmingly nice/chill/friendly, which is one of the reasons I love the sport.

    Leave a comment:


  • ski2man
    replied
    Originally posted by Scott View Post
    To answer the orignial question - yes, I do find groups of 9 annoying. I'm referring to playing in them. Seriously, who has time for that? I came to the course to play, not to wait.
    On a totally different side to what I started with thinking...but hell yeah, I agree completely. Part of the reason I don't like playing in groups of more than 4..or even 3. I like to play as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott
    replied
    To answer the orignial question - yes, I do find groups of 9 annoying. I'm referring to playing in them. Seriously, who has time for that? I came to the course to play, not to wait.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott
    replied
    Originally posted by Hayduke View Post
    I play in a group of nine occasionally. We are always courteous to people who want to play through. I don't think we should be putting a maximum group size limit out there, especially on public courses- I think the problem lies more with etiquette. If you are slower than the group behind (regardless of numbers), always let them through as soon as possible.

    It is also our responsibility to educate people to proper etiquette- maybe the OP could have asked the group if he could play through quickly. It takes a real douche to say no.
    More frequent than the group who flat-out says no to a play-through request is the group who takes their time, throws multiple shots, and then hustles to get off the tee before the person behind them gets there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hayduke
    replied
    I play in a group of nine occasionally. We are always courteous to people who want to play through. I don't think we should be putting a maximum group size limit out there, especially on public courses- I think the problem lies more with etiquette. If you are slower than the group behind (regardless of numbers), always let them through as soon as possible.

    It is also our responsibility to educate people to proper etiquette- maybe the OP could have asked the group if he could play through quickly. It takes a real douche to say no.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott
    replied
    When I'm playing with Matthew we find groups (even groups of 3-4) are often very reluctant to let us play through, presumably because they don't want to get stuck behind a kid. The best part is when they finally do let us play through and he outdrives everyone on their card.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jason Philips
    replied
    At Pier most of the larger groups I run into are experienced tournament players. Chances are some of them post here. I think some of the recent disc golf issues I have heard about that plague courses are propagated by experienced players. Most of the time when I run into new players they are happy to hear about the basic etiquette as long as I am not preachy about it. I think there is a need for experienced players to take a moment and re-evaluate the image they really portray to non-experienced players.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bullseye
    replied
    We have had a lot of positive comments on the secondary tee signs we put up at Blue Lake.

    In addition to the actual tee sign we have another space where we've put things like...

    * In the interest of speed of play, please keep group sizes to 5 or fewer players.
    * Trash Barrels every few holes.. Pack it in Pack it out.
    * We are guests in this neighborhood. Please conduct yourselves accordingly.
    * This is an alcohol free park.

    While this will obviously not work 100% of the time, it does inform people that what they might think is perfectly fine... is in fact... not perfectly fine. Passively informing people of the rules makes it a little easier to enforce those rules when necessary.

    The best thing we all can do is lead by example, and politely educate new players. When I say politely, I really mean it. If we're not cordial when approaching people it will backfire on us 9 times
    out of 10.

    Jeff

    Leave a comment:


  • emmarose
    replied
    because i play by myself i end up playing thru groups quite a bit... i usually try to establish some kind of contact before i ask to play through... eye contact when i walk up to the tee, smile, friendly wave if the group in front of me notices me waiting on the tee... that way we are all warmed up to have some kind of interaction... sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't... my fave was a few months ago at horning's when a group of 7 wouldn't let me play through... because there was another group in front of them. i totally bitched out at them (oops) and was like, "is it because i'm a girl??" and then also mentioned they were teaching really excellent etiquette to the young boy they had in their group... i skipped ahead a hole... almost aced it, then the group in front of them let me play through and i proceeded to birdie most of the other holes, i circled back to the hole i had skipped, just being finished by the big group, and was like, "yeah... that really would have slowed you down to let me play through, huh?" and then parked that one, too. they didn't appreciate me one little bit... but i hope it helped them to learn in the long run that it's okay to let people play through. i admit, tho, not my finest moment, but at the same time pretty satisfying.

    i really do think it's rude to play in a group more than 6... and only 6 if it's pretty competent players who are going to move along at a good clip. you've really got to consider the other people who are using the course, too... if you are gonna play in a herd... pay attention and take the responsibility to be aware and step aside for the smaller groups.

    on another note, someone mentioned when people want to join up... this happens to me, also... and i've come up with the statement, "naw, not today. today i'm working." it's legit and doesn't make people feel bad that i don't want to play with them... because, i know, i am so very cool that everyone wants to play with me, right?

    Leave a comment:


  • Garro
    replied
    One thing I think we should be doing about this problem to be proactive in a positive way is to start offering free information and skills clinics at your home course. Pick a Saturday, get a flyer up at the course, round up a few local golfers or club members and start educating the public. This can be done in a low key, polite and even fun way -- get a sponsor to offer some swag to the people. A couple folks can offer skills instruction off to the side, while a couple others are at the first tee to explain what you're trying to do.

    Stuff like etiquette and care of the course can be covered and you can answer people's questions, etc. Environmental degradation is also a serious problem at a lot of courses. You can tell people that doing this kind of stuff will help show the parks department that disc golfers care about the park and will help make sure the course will last for years.

    Leave a comment:


  • WestsoundBT
    replied
    Ski,

    I hadn't really experienced running into much "mob golf" around Westsound, but perhaps like you had always heard of the phenomenon.

    Then I had the chance to spend a weekend in Santa Cruz and got in several days at Delaveaga.

    On Sunday starting at 11:00 it appeared... The infamous mob golf groups. I said to myself... "It does exist... wow... yupp - 9 dudes, 2 girlfriends, 3 dogs (one being carried, and two off leash), and three coolers.. wow".

    The interesting factor to it faded quickly when I realized that it wasn't just one mob... there was two or three others getting ready to follow them.

    Leave a comment:


  • ski2man
    replied
    Originally posted by dricks View Post
    I consider myself being very cordial on the course but have to constantly deal with people not so. Frustrating.
    I think I have this problem with every day life as well, and it's getting to me I guess. Glad people understand. I wish disc golf was immune to it.

    Time to move to a cave in a mountain and become a hermit. I'll make my mountain course out of wooden "tone poles" so to speak and play it every day while living off of little green plants and squirrel. No one will bother me there!

    Leave a comment:

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