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  • Tough Tee Signs

    Howdy, I've been trying to find a vandal resistant tee sign design for a while now and even built my own prototype. We want to put in signs at SeaTac but I am unwilling to put up "T-Ball height" standard signs that WILL get smashed plus I want a design that will allow for quick and cheap repair/replacement as needed.

    Criteria:
    1. Must withstand impact from wood baseball bat.
    2. Unstealable (or so ugly no one will steal it)
    3. Easy removal of the top layer of plexi/lexan/unobtainium if broken/scratched or painted/inked.
    4. All parts of sign must be easily found at a decent neighborhood hardware store or Home Depot/Lowe's.

    My prototype (which passed baseball bat test) was a 12" square cement paver from HD with a layer of roofing felt (padding) three layers of thicker plexiglass and a final thin layer of plexi (cheap and easily replaced). I set angle iron pieces at the top and bottom and used carriage bolts and threaded rod to attach everything together. I dismantled it but will reassemble and post pics.

    My goal is to get a easy to build (with basic tools) tee sign design out so new courses and old ones with vandalism problems can make their course better.

    Thanks for your help, Bro
    What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?

  • #2
    Im working with SignDesigns here in Oly,(the owner just happens to be a friend of mine). Our plan is putting 6"x8" posts' in the ground and cutting the top of at a 60 degree angle, this will give a solid flat surface that is angled for visibillity. Then mounting signs (similar to road signs, grafitti resistant) flush on all 4 sides, with tamper resistant screws. We even got an Eagle scout to aquire and set the post's for us. Cost per sign is around $17, pretty basic design, but effective.

    If your interested I can put you in touch with the sign maker.
    A bad day on the golf course is better than a good day at work!

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    • #3
      Hmm, yeah, please do post pics, Bro. I'm having a hard time visualizing what the finished product looks like. So is the sign mounted on a post or something? Or is it flush with the ground? I'm not sure if I've ever seen one flush before, but that might not be a bad idea...blends in with the environment (less of a target for hoodlums), and friendly to mowers. The only bad part would be for newbies who don't know the course layout and wouldn't have an easy visual cue from a distance.
      Untwist thine undergarments, 'tis but a Frisbee.

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      • #4
        You could also try a sheet metal manufacturing warehouse. Maybe have some signs cnc'd out of stainless with the routes to various baskets being routed directly into the metal itself. That way the only way you are going to vandalize those bastards is if you actually rip them out of the ground.
        "Honest work is for the downtrodden and the Polish"
        Cleveland Brown

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        • #5
          Cascades Gateway in Salem and Adair near Albany have short, stout wooden posts whose tops have been cut at an angle, and a square or oval piece of plexiglass is screwed onto the top. They seem pretty sturdy.
          Oregon disc golf map

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          • #6
            Well, like we used to say in the navy:
            Nothing is kid proof, or sailor proof.
            The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
            ...but it plays one on TV.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Adam Schneider View Post
              Cascades Gateway in Salem and Adair near Albany have short, stout wooden posts whose tops have been cut at an angle, and a square or oval piece of plexiglass is screwed onto the top. They seem pretty sturdy.
              They used a similar technique at Van Zee in Port Orchard, that I think is very effective. They just took trees ~6" in diameter and cut them to about 3-4' and burried the first foot of them. They cut them at the same angle, painted the angle white then painted the needed info right there in black. Some of the signs are from trees that were actually there, I think, and others had to be put there. They're very sturdy and they look pretty nice on the course.
              A par is not a bogey.

              Comment


              • #8
                If you are not using ground contact treated wood, you should choose a rot-resistant wood of some kind. Even if you are using treated, any cut surfaces that go underground should be painted with wood preservative. Posts should not have the sapwood on them. That's the different colored (usually lighter) layer just under where the bark was. In most species of wood, the sapwood is quite prone to rot, even cedar. If I were making posts such as these from untreated wood, I would soak the part that is to go underground and maybe even drill some holes to allow the wood preservative to penetrate more deeply. You don't want to have to do this every couple of years, eh?

                As far as setting the posts, tamping is everything. When you backfill the holes, take a good stick and really ram the dirt down hard every couple of inches. Setting post with concrete can accelerate rotting.
                The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                ...but it plays one on TV.

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                • #9
                  Van Zee park was known as the place for the neighborhood kids to hang out in. After the course was installed, the activity from the bad kids was drastically reduced. That being said, I wanted to use a tee sign design that inexpensive to make, detered vandalism from the local kids and looked somewhat natural.

                  The wood post/tee signs at Van Zee have been in the ground for almost three years and are still solid. Yes, they came from downed trees on site. Most of the tee posts are 8" to 10" in diameter.

                  Knock on wood. The only damage has been a little grafitti here and there, but nothing a paint brush can't fix. I usually touch up paint the tee signs once during the year.

                  If you go the dgcoursereview.com site and look at the pictures for Van Zee park, you might be able to see a picture of the tee signs/posts.

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                  • #10
                    Van Zee tee sign:


                    (click to embiggen)
                    Oregon disc golf map

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ok so here are the pics:
                      Cement paver:

                      First layer of plexi:


                      Add a fancy teesign (thanks to Brian for the idea!!)


                      Top layer of thick plexi:


                      And final thin easily replaceable layer of plexi:


                      Final prototype teesign:


                      Anchor to wood, concrete or pre-embed the angled ties to a prepoured base:


                      The teesign is for hole two at SeaTac- two routes shown on the overhead shot and mirrored by the color coded circles.

                      OK, start your ultra-crafty minds and let's make a smarter easier package that we can give to the world. Yeah, that's the ticket.
                      What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If that is printed on paper, you'll want to be sure to keep out any moisture. So, it would be best to laminate the page before clamping it in there. If sunlight can hit it, you'll want to avoid colors of ink that will fade quickly.
                        The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                        ...but it plays one on TV.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yeah, I left the original in the yard for a year to see what happened and the water wicked in and trashed the paper. I wonder what I have to do to get UV resistant ink or paper. Maybe I'll laminate the paper with SPF 60 Coppertone? Even B/W will fade in the sun.

                          Also the metal angle iron needs to be painted to prevent rust and the sign should be mounted at an angle for drainage.
                          What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?

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                          • #14
                            Red and yellow inks are the ones that go fastest. Black and dark blue are pretty good for the long run. Hell, clear plastic has only a few years of life in direct sun. But what can you do? Booby-trapping the signs is illegal.
                            The Corporate Empire is NOT a Constitutional Republic...
                            ...but it plays one on TV.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by The Course Bro View Post
                              Yeah, I left the original in the yard for a year to see what happened and the water wicked in and trashed the paper. I wonder what I have to do to get UV resistant ink or paper. Maybe I'll laminate the paper with SPF 60 Coppertone? Even B/W will fade in the sun.

                              Also the metal angle iron needs to be painted to prevent rust and the sign should be mounted at an angle for drainage.
                              It's not cheap but Home Depot sells UV protected Plexiglas. I like the Coppertone idea. You could make all signs face north so that they receive less direct sunlight.
                              "Operator! Give me the number for 911! " - Homer S.

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