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  • GettinBetter
    started a topic Lakewood Open

    Lakewood Open

    Does anyone know what disc is in the player pack?

  • cefire
    replied
    Fixed it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVFg_cJsncg

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  • cefire
    replied
    Oh thanks! Should be a pretty easy fix...

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  • Flash
    replied
    Originally posted by cefire View Post
    It has taken much longer than I wanted, but here is a short video of this years final nine at the Lakewood Open:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waGcQjdbgWA
    Something is wrong with the video as it goes black at 4:56 of the 9 + minutes of listed video!

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  • cefire
    replied
    It has taken much longer than I wanted, but here is a short video of this years final nine at the Lakewood Open:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waGcQjdbgWA

    Leave a comment:


  • snap7times
    replied
    rightttt... I was only speaking of the situations we can easily control.. Interesting enough is a PDGA final 9 with a huge gallery is wayyyy different than a DDGA final 9 in terms of spectator control. Both are exactly the same however different expectations are had of the spectators, we carry sniper rifles and pop anyone in sight of the throwers... nono just kidding... since trozzle is the only person on here to experience both pdga and ddga galleries for the final round, wonder if he noticed any differences or they the same?

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  • Mystjava
    replied
    Originally posted by ChUcK View Post
    When it comes to being in front of another person's lie, hmmm. I've seen the best of them all gathered around the circle watching each other putt during sudden-death play-offs (stationary, of course) and I've seen the most hard-core 905-rated ams freak out with a competitor at the very edge of their peripheral vision during a weekly doubles match.
    This I can deal with because it is at the hole - it's the approaches from tee off to the basket is what bugs me when we cannot respect each other.

    Originally posted by ChUcK View Post
    A crow will caw right as you reach back for your approach shot. A mosquito will fly up your nose sometimes. The wind makes the trees sway all over the place. The best golfers are able to remove those distractions with their impeccable control over their mind, not their impeccable control over the environment. Fellow competitors will always be distractions, it's impossible to not be one. Intentional distractions are disallowed by the rules, but unintentional distractions (like the next card walking down the fairway 300 ft ahead) are fine, and must be dealt with by you.

    Besides, how can we ever expect to draw huge golf crowds if the gallery is required to always be in the rear 180 degrees of the current thrower? It would be a damn human stampede at each green as the spectators scrambled to get out of the way of the next putt, especially if the card had the basket surrounded. If there's motion in your field of vision that you can't control, then deal with it. If you can control it, then do. (something about the wisdom to know the difference.)
    Those are part of the daily activities - it is to be expected - and I usually handle those alright, but when someone is disrespectful and have been told previously, then thats a different question all together.

    Chuck - thanks for taking the time to listen and to be a voice of concern. I appreciate it! We need players who applies their common sense and wisdom/patience of understanding!
    Last edited by Mystjava; July 1st, 2009, 06:47 AM. Reason: typo error.

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  • ChUcK
    replied
    Mystjava, that pretty much sums up the way I think all golfers should treat one another, with equal courtesy and 'silence' in all respects, such as smoke, noise, and motion.

    When it comes to being in front of another person's lie, hmmm. I've seen the best of them all gathered around the circle watching each other putt during sudden-death play-offs (stationary, of course) and I've seen the most hard-core 905-rated ams freak out with a competitor at the very edge of their peripheral vision during a weekly doubles match.

    A crow will caw right as you reach back for your approach shot. A mosquito will fly up your nose sometimes. The wind makes the trees sway all over the place. The best golfers are able to remove those distractions with their impeccable control over their mind, not their impeccable control over the environment. Fellow competitors will always be distractions, it's impossible to not be one. Intentional distractions are disallowed by the rules, but unintentional distractions (like the next card walking down the fairway 300 ft ahead) are fine, and must be dealt with by you.

    Besides, how can we ever expect to draw huge golf crowds if the gallery is required to always be in the rear 180 degrees of the current thrower? It would be a damn human stampede at each green as the spectators scrambled to get out of the way of the next putt, especially if the card had the basket surrounded. If there's motion in your field of vision that you can't control, then deal with it. If you can control it, then do. (something about the wisdom to know the difference.)

    oh, and trozzle!!!, your post is not worthy of quoting and refuting.

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  • snap7times
    replied
    Originally posted by ChUcK View Post
    You should probably edit one of those posts, just so they match up with one another.
    pffllltttt, in general, slight movements anywhere in the 180 or 178 degrees to be exact of the view of the Deaf person will most likely become an eyesore and will disrupt focus as most of the time a hearing person will not even notice something to the side.
    I've played enough tournaments to notice the dramatic differences in visual courtesy in PDGA and DDGA tournaments, and I do mean dramatic... Only reason I bring it up is because it happened at lakewood repeatedly, being in the 178 degrees of vision for a certain player and the group didnt think it was such a big deal even when asked to move out of the view... Anyone that has played with me knows this, get out of my vision and I stay out of yours... Not asking for preferential treatment, its in the rules in the handbook, 801.01, period... bending it just cuz it dosent seem to bother you is just not cool...

    now let's move on, didn't think anyone would debate it...

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  • Mystjava
    replied
    I might as well as try to clear things up a bit here.. It might offend some but then it might shed some light on what's going on. When a deaf (or hard of hearing - hoh) person comes up to the tee to play, it is respectful to give them the same benifit of "slience" which would be visual as providing silence (no talking) for the hearing person as well. Yes, some of us do have hearing aids to aid in understanding things and with communication. But our aids are not always the answer - I can't hear when someone is behind me - I do prefer to read lips and have someone speak clearly - not loudly, but clearly. If I am not wearing my hearing aids - I cannot hear you.. I won't be able to understand the lip reading either - so I would revet back to using ASL. However, I am still sensitive to some sounds and to visual cues.

    I'm sure that some of us are uncomfortable when someone smokes while playing disc golf, so it is usual customs to move away from the group so the smoke doesn't bother the other players. Common sense? Yeah, I thought so, so in respect - it would be common sense to be "silent" in all forms. Some of us are more sensitive than others, but also some of us have a hard time trying to explain why we need to be respectful without much fingerpointing.

    Thirdly and finally - if you're a new player who is going to play for the first PDGA tournament, please to take the time to read the players' manual (PDGA rules and guidelines) so you're aware of what to expect and when to expect it. Please do stand behind the tee - regardless if your disc is way up to the left about twenty feet ahead of one players' disc.. It is respectful to wait behind the "tee" (invisible or not). Please use your eyes to see where everyone else is - who's up, who's next? Use common sense - in a tournament - we need to be ready at all times. Get your disc out and be ready to go.

    As if the offense was regarding how slow the round went - sorry - there is nothing I can do about that. I am not going to come up with excuse, but I will say - some of us just walks slower than others - think about it -

    I do appreciate you learning the simple signs for the numbers, when it came down to recording the information. The same can be done when we're trying to show who's first, second, third, and so forth. Again .. I hope this will become a learning experience for all of us.

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  • Trozzle!!!
    replied
    Its common knowledge that a loss of one sense or another leads to better use of the other senses. I am not saying that because a player is deaf that you need to stand farther back out of sight than you would for a hearing player. I dont think Snap's biggest problem was because of that.

    I already knew, but found out more when working at the 2009 ODDCG. Many deaf people can actually hear. They may be medically "deaf" but with the use of hearing aids, or actually being able to hear some what naturally, they are still considered deaf.

    Just because they are "deaf" doesnt give anyone the right to just keep on talking normally because the person who is throwing is "deaf". There is a chance that he or she can still hear you, and it could throw off their throw. I think this is what Snap was most concerened with.

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  • ChUcK
    replied
    Originally posted by snap7times View Post
    there needs to be more sensitivity to their line of sight
    Originally posted by snap7times View Post
    I never mentioned preferential treatment
    You should probably edit one of those posts, just so they match up with one another.

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  • snap7times
    replied
    I never mentioned preferential treatment, just stating the obvious since it just isn't obvious to some people. One person's common sense is another person's ignorance.

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  • ChUcK
    replied
    Originally posted by snap7times View Post
    Let's just say that the players on the same card did not respect their repeated request to get out of their line of sight and they didn't know it was a firm rule under courtesy violations so they didnt call it. And they were yapping away thinking they were being unheard while it was their turn to throw.. that paint a better picture?
    I don't need the picture painted, not with 4th hand knowledge of the event. I talked to both parties concerned and the issue seems simple to me.

    You said that deaf players deserve preferential treatment, and I said yeah right. The only way any different treatment is necessary is when recording scores. I would have to change the way I sign the number three from the way I normally would, with an OK sign, to what is actually three, thumb/pointer/ring finger. Otherwise, I would give you the exact same courtesy as anyone else, and expect the same in return.

    Oh, I guess a more aggressive approach to avoid incoming discs could be in order, as well.

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  • GettinBetter
    replied
    A sad thing is that some people are just naturally assholes.

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